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  • The Pale King is David Foster Wallace's final novel - a testament to his enduring brilliance The Internal Revenue Service Regional Examination Centre in Peoria, Illinois, 1985. Here the minutaie of a million daily lives are totted up, audited and accounted for. Here the workers fight a never-ending war against the urgency of their own boredom. Here then, squeezed between the trivial and the quotidian, lies all human life. And this is David Foster Wallace's towering, brilliant, hilarious and deeply moving final novel.

    'Breathtakingly brilliant, funny, maddening and elegiac' New York Times 'A bravura performance worthy of Woolf or Joyce. Wallace's finest work as a novelist' Time 'Light-years beyond Infinite Jest. Wallace's reputation will only grow, and like one of the broken columns beloved of Romantic painters, The Pale King will stand, complete in its incompleteness, as his most substantial fictional achievement' Hari Kunzru, Financial Times 'A paradise of language and intelligence' The Times 'Archly brilliant' Metro 'Teems with erudition and ideas, with passages of stylistic audacity, with great cheerful thrown-out gags, goofy puns and moments of truly arresting clarity. Innovative, penetrating, forcefully intelligent fiction like Wallace's arrives once in a generation, if that' Daily Telegraph 'In a different dimension to the tepid vapidities that pass as novels these days. Sentence for sentence, almost word for word, Wallace could out-write any of his peers' Scotland on Sunday David Foster Wallace wrote the novels Infinite Jest and The Broom of the System, and the short-story collections Oblivion, Brief Interviews with Hideous Men and Girl with Curious Hair. His non-fiction includes Consider the Lobster, A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again, Everything and More, This is Water and Both Flesh and Not. He died in 2008.

  • Both Flesh and Not is an collection of essays and writing from the virtuosic genius David Foster Wallace Beloved for his brilliantly discerning eye, his verbal elasticity and his uniquely generous imagination, David Foster Wallace was heralded by critics and fans as the voice of a generation. Collected here are fifteen essays published for the first time in book form, including writing never published before in the UK.

    From 'Federer Both Flesh and Not', considered by many to be his non-fiction masterpiece; to 'The (As it Were) Seminal Importance of Terminator 2,' which deftly dissects James Cameron's blockbuster; to 'Fictional Futures and the Conspicuously Young', an examination of television's effect on a new generation of writers, the writing collected here swoops from erudite literary discussion to open-hearted engagement with the most familiar of our twentieth-century cultural references.

    A celebration of Wallace's great loves - for language, for precision, for meaning - and a feast of enjoyment for his fans, Both Flesh and Not is a fitting tribute to this writer who was never concerned with anything less important than what it means to be alive.

    Praise for David Foster Wallace:

    'A visionary, a craftsman, a comedian . . . he's in a different time-space continuum from the rest of us' Zadie Smith 'Wallace's essays brim with cerebral energy, acute observation and fizzing wit. Enviably good' Sunday Times 'Wallace's exuberance and intellectual impishness are a delight . . . a superb comedian of culture' Guardian, James Wood David Foster Wallace wrote the novels Infinite Jest and The Broom of the System, and the short-story collections Oblivion, Brief Interviews with Hideous Men and Girl with Curious Hair. His non-fiction includes Consider the Lobster, A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again, Everything and More, This is Water and Both Flesh and Not. He died in 2008.

  • The David Foster Wallace Reader is a selection of David Foster Wallace's work, introducing readers to his humour, kindness, sweeping intellect and versatility as a writer.

    A compilation from the one of the most original writers of our age, featuring:

    · the very best of his fiction and non-fiction;
    · previously unpublished writing · and original contributions from 12 prominent authors and critics about his work From classic short fiction to genre-defining reportage, this book is a must for new readers and confirmed David Foster Wallace fans alike'One of the most dazzling luminaries of contemporary American fiction' Sunday Times 'There are times, reading his work, when you get halfway through a sentence and gasp involuntarily, and for a second you feel lucky that there was, at least for a time, someone who could make sense like no other of what it is to be a human in our era' Daily Telegraph 'A prose magician, Mr. Wallace was capable of writing . . .about subjects from tennis to politics to lobsters, from the horrors of drug withdrawal to the small terrors of life aboard a luxury cruise ship, with humour and fervour and verve' Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times David Foster Wallace wrote the novels The Pale King, Infinite Jest, and The Broom of the System and three story collections. His nonfiction includes Consider the Lobster and A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again. He died in 2008.

  • Where do you begin with a writer as original and brilliant as David Foster Wallace? Here: with a carefully considered selection from his extraordinary body of work, chosen by a range of fellow writers, critics, and those who worked with him most closely. This volume presents both his funniest and his most heart-breaking work - essays such as his classic cruise-ship piece, 'A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again', excerpts from his novels The Broom of the System, Infinite Jest, and The Pale King, and legendary stories like 'The Depressed Person'. Collected for the first time are Wallace's first published story, 'The View from Planet Trillaphon as Seen In Relation to the Bad Thing' and a selection of his work as a professor of writing, including reading lists, grammar guides and the unique general guidelines he wrote for his students.A dozen writers and critics, including Hari Kunzru, Anne Fadiman, and Nam Le, add afterwords to favourite pieces, expanding our appreciation of the unique pleasures of Wallace's writing. The result is an astonishing volume that shows the breadth and range of 'one of the most dazzling luminaries of contemporary American fiction' (Sunday Times) whose work was full of humour, insight, and beauty.

  • Brilliant, dazzling, never-before-collected non-fiction, by the legendary David Foster Wallace Beloved for his wonderfully discerning eye, his verbal elasticity and his uniquely generous imagination, David Foster Wallace was heralded by critics and fans as the voice of a generation. Collected in Both Flesh and Not are fifteen essays published for the first time in book form.

    From 'Federer Both Flesh and Not', considered by many to be his nonfiction masterpiece; to 'The (As it Were) Seminal Importance of Terminator 2,' which deftly dissects James Cameron's blockbuster; to 'Fictional Futures and the Conspicuously Young', an examination of television's effect on a new generation of writers, David Foster Wallace's writing swoops from erudite literary discussion to open-hearted engagement with the most familiar of our twentieth-century cultural references.

    A celebration of David Foster Wallace's great loves - for language, for precision, for meaning - and a feast of enjoyment for his fans, Both Flesh and Not is a fitting tribute to this writer who was never concerned with anything less important than what it means to be alive.

    Praise for David Foster Wallace:

    'A visionary, a craftsman, a comedian . . . he's in a different time-space continuum from the rest of us.' Zadie Smith 'Wallace's essays brim with cerebral energy, acute observation and fizzing wit. Enviably good.' Sunday Times 'A prose magician . . . He could map the infinite and infinitesimal, the mythic and mundan.' Michiko Kakutani, New York Times

  • David Foster Wallace's last and most ambitious undertaking The agents at the IRS Regional Examination Center in Peoria, Illinois, appear ordinary to newly arrived trainee David Foster Wallace. But as he immerses himself in a routine so tedious and repetitive that new employees receive boredom-survival Wallace learns of the extraordinary variety of personalities drawn to this strange calling. And he has arrived at a moment when forces within the IRS are plotting to eliminate what little humanity and dignity the work still has.

    Imagined with the interior force and generosity that were David Foster Wallace's unique gifts, The Pale King grapples directly with ultimate questions - life's meaning, the value of work, the importance of connection - and commands infinite respect for one of the most daring writers of our time.



    'Overflows with Wallace's humour, compassion and, above all, his rolling, powerful, crashingly beautiful prose.' Sunday Times 'Anyone who has read Wallace will know the thrilling, intimate experience of following one of his giant held breaths of attention and feeling it fill your mind with thoughts that feel like your own.' Sunday Age 'One of the saddest and most lovely books I've ever read . . . D.F.W. writes sentences and sometimes whole pages that make you feel like you can't breathe . . . Let's state this clearly: You should read The Pale King.' Esquire 'I started to think in Wallace-style sentences, and started to think that Wallace-style senteces are in fact the only sensible way of describing the world.' Sunday Times

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