Hern Nick Digital

  • A smouldering play about escaping the past, seizing the present and owning the future.
    2nd May 1997. An historic victory. The Tories, eighteen years in power, are defeated as New Labour sweeps into government. From the euphoria and despair, three deeply personal stories emerge.
    Tory MP Robert prepares to attend the count. With defeat looming large, he fears becoming a forgotten man, while his wife Marie counts the cost of her own sacrifice to politics. Lib Dem footsoldier Ian is no hero, but party-crasher Sarah is determined to make him one. Best mates Jake and Will wake up with a new world order to memorise before their A-level Politics class. Jake dreams of Number 10. Will dreams of Jake.
    'rising playwright Jack Thorne takes us back in time with such quiet profundity and verve you get a burst of inspiration to match the uplift of those distant days' - Telegraph

  • Phil and Alice are in love - familiar, flawed, ordinary love. They are on a journey, but this journey doesn’t have an A to Z. Jack Thorne's The Solid Life of Sugar Water is an intimate, tender play about loss, hurt and rediscovery. It previewed at The Drum, Theatre Royal Plymouth, and premiered at the 2015 Edinburgh Festival Fringe, in a co-production between Graeae Theatre Company and Theatre Royal Plymouth.

  • Anglais Bunny

    Thorne Jack

    An exhilarating coming-of-age drama for a solo performer. Fringe First Award, Edinburgh 2010 Scorching heat. A fight. A car chase. A siege. When her boyfriend is attacked on the street, feisty eighteen-year-old Katie is thrust on a white-knuckle ride through one extraordinary evening. Amidst the baying for blood and the longing for love, Katie is forced to decide her future. 'Electrifying combination of streetwise earthiness and heartbreaking vulnerability... terrific' Scotsman

  • Anglais Mydidae

    Thorne Jack

    One bathroom. Two people. One day. A relationship witnessed in minute, devastating detail. A story of intimacy, fragility and the darker side of love, Jack Thorne's Mydidae exposes the private and disturbing moments a couple share, and explores what becomes of a relationship when it is held together not only by love, but by fear, guilt and despair. 'A two-hander full of unexpected menace that probes and chips at its characters, peeling back layers of skin... a potent piece of writing' Exeunt Magazine 'Like a punch in the gut... what makes all of this not only bearable but completely transfixing is the unmistakeable honesty of the writing' Whatsonstage.com

  • A play about grief and looking at someone that little bit more closely. Tom's brother Luke is dead. This has upset a lot of people but it hasn't upset Tom. Or, rather, it has upset him, but in ways he can't explain and other people can't understand. You see, Tom and Luke were never friends. In fact, Tom didn't really like Luke at all. So it's an odd decision - to try and bury Luke in the pavement of the Tunstall Estate where he was killed. But to Tom, it sort of makes sense, in a stupid-weird kind of way. As he sleeps out on the pavement, he comes across planning officials, tramps, undertakers, police officers, sisters, mothers, estate agents, ghosts, pavement elephants, sky dragons and a strange lad called Tight who wants to sell him a Travelcard. Written specifically for young people, Burying Your Brother in the Pavement was part of the 2008 National Theatre Connections Festival and was premiered by youth theatres across the UK.

  • A painful – and painfully funny – play about being very young and in love – and coping with serious illness at the same time. Rachel and Peter are seventeen. They have been going out for six months. It's love's young dream. Then Rachel gets ill – seriously ill. She doesn't want her mum to fuss; she doesn't want Alice to pretend she's her best friend; and she certainly doesn't want Alice's boyfriend telling bad jokes at her bedside. The only person she wants is Peter, but Peter doesn't know what it is that he wants. When You Cure Me premiered at the Bush Theatre, London, in 2005. 'In one of the year's finest pieces of new writing... a compassionate, gripping portrait of a fledgling relationship that is asked to bear more than many well-established marriages' Evening Standard 'painstakingly honest... acutely observant of the petty rivalries and jealousies that sickness provokes' Guardian '[has] a merciless precision... a brave piece of writing that, with its damaged and angry heroine, unflinchingly shows us not a vision of saintly suffering, but a far more engagingly human struggle for survival' The Times

  • Acclaimed for his screenplays for TV dramas including Skins, Shameless, The Fades, This is England '86/'88/'90 and Glue, Jack Thorne first emerged as a writer of unflinching, compassionate and often challenging plays for the stage. Described as a ‘powerful voice for Britain's youth' (Independent), he remains one of the most distinctive talents working in theatre today. This collection, with a revealing introduction by the author, covers a period of intense creativity – beginning with When You Cure Me (Bush Theatre, 2005), a painful – and painfully funny – play about being very young and in love, and coping with serious illness at the same time. ‘One of the year's finest pieces of new writing' Evening Standard In the monologue play Stacy (Arcola Theatre, 2007), twenty-something Rob tells the story of a confusing couple of days in which everything in his life seems to have gone wrong. ‘A pin-sharp, brilliant piece of work' Time Out 2nd May 1997 (Bush Theatre, 2009) distils all the euphoria and despair of New Labour's landslide electoral victory into three stories told with ‘quiet profundity and verve' (Telegraph), while Bunny (Edinburgh Fringe, 2010) is a white-knuckle ride through the streets of contemporary Britain, written for a solo female performer. ‘Terrific' Scotsman Red Car, Blue Car is a heartbreaking short play about guilt, grief and responsibility, written for and performed at the Bush in 2011. Finally, Mydidae (Soho Theatre, 2012), a two-hander set entirely in a bathroom, is an electrifyingly intimate account of the darker side of love which hits audiences ‘like a punch in the gut' (Whatsonstage.com)

  • An urgent political play from the writer behind Let The Right One In and This is England '86. Hope is a funny and scathing fable attacking the squeeze on local government. How do you save twenty-two million pounds? Mark and Hilary, the leaders of the Council, are about to find out. Jack Thorne's Hope premiered at the Royal Court Theatre, London, in November 2014. 'valuable and timely... a sunburst of optimism' - Daily Telegraph 'a surprisingly entertaining state-of-the-nation drama'- The Stage 'mischievous without being strident, combining pensiveness and wry humour' - Evening Standard 'sharp yet generous-spirited... [Hope] earns its final glow of optimism by being a critical, hard-edged play that is not a cynical one... it's rather beautiful' - The Times 'Jack Thorne's play about local authority cuts could not be more timely: what is equally important is that it entertains even as it offers a call to arms... [Hope] is part of a valuable tradition in combining the residual optimism of David Hare with the preoccupation with process of David Edgar. But it exists on its own terms and is particularly good on edgy personal relationships... it resonantly lives up to its title' - Guardian

  • A troubled, disturbing but bleakly funny play from a leading writer of Channel 4's Shameless and Skins. Fanny and Faggot presents two distinct moments in the life of Mary Bell: her trial when accused of the murder of two small boys, and her escape from the open prison in 1977, when she spent the weekend on the run in Blackpool and lost her virginity.

  • A heartbreaking short play about guilt, grief and responsibility, written for and performed at the Bush Theatre, London, in 2011.

  • Rob finds life confusing in a world of unwritten rules. If there's no one around to tell him right from wrong, except for a copy of FHM and a call-centre supervisor, he just has to guess. But he's never been very lucky, and sometimes he gets his guesses very wrong. This play was first staged at the Arcola Theatre, in 2007. 'a pin-sharp, brilliant piece of work' - Time Out, Critics' Choice 'a challenging, disturbing and distinctive new voice' - The Times 'This one man show will blow your socks off... one of the most entertaining nights I've had at the theatre' - London Lite

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