Peter Fonagy

  • A Bestseller
    Attachment Theory shows scientifically how our earliest relationships with our mothers influence our later relationships in life. This book offers an excellent introduction to the findings of attachment theory and the major schools of psychoanalytic thought.
    "The book every student, colleague, and even rival theoretician has been waiting for. With characteristic wit, philosophical sophistication, scholarship, humanity, incisiveness, and creativity, Fonagy succinctly describes the links, differences, and future directions of his twin themes. [His book] is destined to take its place as one of a select list of essential psychology books of the decade."
    -Jeremy Holmes, Senior Lecturer in Psychotherapy, University of Exeter
    "Extraordinary--an invaluable resource for developmental psychoanalysis."
    -Joy D. Osofsky, Professor, Louisiana State University

  • Winner of the 2003 Gradiva Award and the 2003 Goethe Award for Psychoanalytic Scholarship
    Arguing for the importance of attachment and emotionality in the developing human consciousness, four prominent analysts explore and refine the concepts of mentalization and affect regulation. Their bold, energetic, and encouraging vision for psychoanalytic treatment combines elements of developmental psychology, attachment theory, and psychoanalytic technique. Drawing extensively on case studies and recent analytic literature to illustrate their ideas, Fonagy, Gergely, Jurist, and Target offer models of psychotherapy practice that can enable the gradual development of mentalization and affect regulation even in patients with long histories of violence or neglect.

  • Dynamic Interpersonal Therapy (DIT) is a brief psychodynamic psychotherapy developed for the treatment of mood disorders. It is being rolled out as part of the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) initiative as the psychodynamic model for the treatment of depression.

    This book is a user-friendly, practical guide for the implementation of a brief psychodynamic intervention in routine clinical practice as well as in research protocols. It sets out clearly the theoretical framework, as well as the rationale and strategies for applying DIT with patients presenting with mood disorders (depression and anxiety). Throughout, it is illustrated with detailed examples that help the reader to implement the approach in their practice.

    The book will be required reading to support the national IAPT training initiative, as well as providing a resource for mental health professionals specialising in psychodynamic psychotherapy and wishing to work within a limited time frame.

  • Mentalizing - the ability to understand oneself and others by inferring mental states that lie behind overt behaviour - develops within the context of attachment relationships. It is crucial to self-regulation and constructive, intimate relationships, both of which are impaired in personality disorders because of sensitivity to losing mentalizing at times of anxiety and attachment stress. Loss of mentalizing leads to interpersonal and social problems, emotional
    variability, impulsivity, self-destructive behaviours, and violence.

    This practical guide on mentalization-based treatment (MBT) of personality disorders outlines the mentalizing model of borderline and antisocial personality disorders and how it translates into clinical treatment. The book, divided into four parts - the mentalizing framework, basic mentalizing practice, mentalizing and groups, and mentalizing systems - covers the aims and structure of treatment, outlines how patients are introduced to the mentalizing model so that their personality disorder
    makes sense to them, explains why certain interventions are recommended and others are discouraged, and systematically describes the process of treatment in both group and individual therapy to support more stable mentalizing.

    People with personality disorders commonly have comorbid mental health problems, such as depression and eating disorders, which complicate clinical treatment. Therefore, the book advises the clinician on how to manage comorbidity in treatment. In addition, mentalizing problems in families and social systems, for example, schools and mental health services are also covered. A families and carers training and support guide is provided as families and others are often neglected during the
    treatment of people with personality disorder.

    The book is a valuable guide for all mental health workers on how to effectively treat personality disorders.

  • This volume dedicated to personality and conduct disorders contains part of the conferences given during the 5th Congress of the International Society of Adolescent Psychiatry (ISAP), which took place in Aix-en-Provence in the presence of 900 specialists on July 4-7, 1999.

  • Pioneering research has been carried out over the last decade on mentalization and the promotion of mentalizing capacity - the ability to interpret the behavior of oneself and others as based on intentional mental states, such as needs, desires, feelings, and beliefs. This book is a consolidation of current knowledge and clinical applications, bringing together a group of international experts who have been on the ground floor of theory and research to clarify the concept, review pertinent neurobiological and psychosocial research, and explore its diverse clinical applications. Four sections will cover Conceptual Foundations, Developmental Psychopathology, Intervention and Prevention. A biopsychosocial approach will be used, integrating new research in neuroimaging with psychodynamic and cognitive perspectives. Clinical issues covered will include parent-child interactions, personality disorders, traumatic brain injury, bullying and at-risk children.

  • Social inequality and social disadvantage provide an all too fertile soil that sustains the majority of the serious mental health problems suffered by children in our society. The complexity of the issues clinicians routinely encounter in working with children with mental health problems is widely acknowledged. However, few books concern themselves with how such difficult populations can be effectively approached and the strategies that are likely to deliver effective treatment to them. This book, based on a highly successful seminar for grant-giving children's charities held at the Anna Freud Centre and sponsored by John Lyon's Charity, provides pragmatic solutions to this major therapeutic challenge of our age. The chapters bridge statutory and voluntary initiatives and are held firmly together by the commitment to evidence-based, systematically offered, programmatic and innovative approaches that can help those who, although hard to reach, are in greatest need of our efforts: the socially excluded children and families in our society. As such, this book will be invaluable to psychologists, psychotherapists, counselors and family therapists.

  • The mainstream upper-level undergraduate textbook designed for first courses in Developmental Psychopathology  Developmental Psychopathology provides a comprehensive introduction to the evolving scientific discipline that focuses on the interactions between the biological, psychological, behavioral, and social contextual aspects of normal and abnormal human development. Designed for advanced undergraduates and early graduate students with no previous engagement with the subject, this well-balanced textbook integrates clinical knowledge and scientific practice to help students understand both how and why mental health problems emerge across the lifespan.  Organized into four parts, the text first provides students with essential background information on traditional approaches to psychopathology, developmental psychopathology (DP), normal development, and insecure attachment. The next section addresses attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and other problems emerging in childhood. Part III covers problems that arise in adolescence and young adulthood, such as depression, suicide, eating disorders, and schizophrenia. The text concludes with a discussion of special topics such as the relation between pathopsychological issues and divorce, separation, and loss. Each chapter includes a visual demonstration of the DP approach, a clinical case, further readings, and discussion questions. Developmental Psychopathology:  Presents a coherent organization of material that illustrates the DP principle of cutting across multiple levels of analysis  Covers common psychopathological problems including antisocial behavior, substance use disorders, fear and anxiety, and emerging personality disorders  Features integrative DP models based on the most recent research in psychopathological disorders  Provides instructors with a consistent pedagogical framework for teaching upper-level students encountering the discipline for the first time  Developmental Psychopathology is the perfect textbook for advanced undergraduate or graduate courses in Child Psychopathology, Abnormal Child Psychology, Clinical Psychology, and Family Dynamics and Psychopathology. 

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