R. M. Pearce

  • The chapters in this book provide detailed analyses of a range of issues that feed into an overview of the strategic development of the MNE over the past 40 years. This modeled as the evolution of the MNE from a multidomestic hierarchy to a network hierarchy to the contemporary strategic diversity of the heterarchy. The extensive range of empirical and conceptual analysis covers the strategic roles and competitive evolution of subsidiaries; the positioning of R&D labs of MNEs; how MNEs' R&D and product development programmes relate to, and affect the performance of, countries' national systems of innovation; the ways in which dispersed subsidiaries and labs now work to support both the effective use of current competitive technologies and the generation of new sources of competitiveness for global firms. An underlying theme of the book, that is also developed conceptually, is how the global operations of MNEs involve selective involvement with national economies and the implications of this for globalization and economic development.

  • This book deals with the Story of Bacteriology and presents a history of Vaccination and Preventive Medicine.
    "The story of bacteriology can best be told by recounting the labors of Pasteur, for while bacteria were known and theories of infection had been elaborated and vaccination practiced before his time, it was he who definitely established the importance of bacteria in putrefaction, fermentation and disease, and gave to vaccination a scientific basis. The influence of these labors is compatible in medicine only to that of Virchow in his field and is as great as that exerted in general biology by Darwin's researches. The story of rapid sequence of Pasteur's brilliant discoveries in science, each of crucial importance and establishing a new principle have, I believe, no parallel in biology or, for that matter, any other science. But before presenting Pasteur's labors it is necessary to outline the knowledge of bacteria and the theories of fermentation, infection and allied processes which were current at the beginning of his era..."

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