Sunita Reddy

  • Through the lens of the Asian tsunami, this book problematizes concepts that are normally taken for granted in disaster discourse, including relief, recovery, reconstruction and rehabilitation. The unprecedented flow of humanitarian aid after the Asian tsunami, though well-intentioned, showed adverse effects and unintended consequences in the lives of people in the communities across nations. Aid led not only to widespread relief and recovery but also to an exacerbation of old forms of inequities and the creation of new ones arising from the prioritization, distribution and management of aid. This, in turn, led to the incongruity between the needs and expectations of the affected and the agendas of aid agencies and their various intermediaries. This book examines the long-term consequences of post-disaster aid by posing the following questions: What has the aid been expended on? Where has the aid primarily been expended, and how? And what were the unintended consequences of post-disaster aid for the communities? 
    This topical volume is of interest to social scientists, human rights and law researchers and environmental scientists interested in disaster studies.

  • This book analyses how developmental projects in a globalizing Delhi have brought about neglect, exclusion and alienation of certain sections of population, while benefiting others. It discusses the physical, economic and social displacement of people in the city in recent times, which has deprived them of their lands, livelihoods and access to health care. In Delhi and the National Capital Region, beyond the obvious and apparent image of wide roads, flyovers, the metro rail network, high-rises and glittering malls, globalization has brought about skewed and uneven development. A growing middle class and a significant group of an extremely rich section of population steer the ways in which development strategies are planned and implemented. Furthermore, with government control reducing as is inevitable and consistent with a neoliberal policy framework, private players have entered not only the consumer goods sector, but also basic goods and services such as agriculture, health and education.   This book explores the effects of such processes, with a specific focus on equity, on the marginalized sections of population in a globalizing megacity. It addresses the themes of land, livelihoods and health as overarching, drawing upon their interlinkages. It traces the changes in the growth of the city in context of these themes and draws inferences from their interconnectedness to examine the current situation of development in Delhi.

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