• Traduit de l'anglais (États-Unis) par Francis Kerline
    L'Amérique, dans un futur proche.
    Les U.S.A., le Canada et le Mexique ont formé une fédération surpuissante, et la Société du Spectacle a gagné : les habitants ne vivent plus qu'à travers la télévision, les médicaments, l'ultra-consommation et le culte de l'excellence. Parmi eux, la famille Incandenza, avec les parents James et Avril et leurs trois fils – dont Hal, un tennisman surdoué promis à un brillant avenir. Mais de dangereux séparatistes québécois, en lutte
    contre la fédération, traquent cette famille singulière pour mettre la main sur une arme redoutable : L'Infinie Comédie, une vidéo réalisée par James Incandenza, qui suscite chez ceux qui la regardent une addiction mortelle...
    Livre culte dès sa parution aux États-Unis en 1996, ce texte prophétique a fasciné ses lecteurs dans le monde entier. Considéré comme l'un des cent meilleurs romans du XXe siècle, L'Infinie Comédie est enfin publié en France.

  • « Faire de quelqu'un une icône, c'est le transformer en abstraction, et les abstractions sont incapables d'une communication vitale avec les vivants. »

    Le premier tome de Considérations sur le homard (L'Olivier, 2018) réunissait les textes de David Foster Wallace consacrés à la politique et à la société américaines. Ce second volume rassemble ses essais sur la littérature, le langage et la communication.

    Qu'il analyse l'humour existentiel de Kafka, qu'il règle son compte aux « écrivains narcissiques » et aux autobiographies de stars du sport ou qu'il dresse le portrait d'un célèbre animateur de radio obsédé par l'affaire O.J Simpson, l'auteur de L'Infinie Comédie continue de nous éblouir par son humour, sa curiosité et surtout sa créativité, qui semble ne connaître aucune limite.

    Traduit de l'anglais (États-Unis) par Jakuta Alikavazovic

  • David Foster Wallace n'était pas qu'un grand romancier. C'était aussi un essayiste chez qui l'humour côtoyait une lucidité redoutable.
    Ce premier tome de Considérations sur le homard regroupe les textes qu'il a consacrés à la société américaine. Qu'il raconte les " Oscars du porno ", la campagne présidentielle de John McCain, le 11-Septembre vu depuis l'Illinois, ou la souffrance du homard plongé dans l'eau bouillante, il ne fait, en somme, qu'une seule chose : nous parler de l'Amérique folle et inquiétante dans laquelle il a vécu, et de l'enfer hilare des temps contemporains.
    Traduit de l'anglais (États-Unis) par Jakuta Alikavazovic

  • In intimate and eloquent interviews, including the last he gave before his suicide, the writer hailed by A.O. Scott of The New York Times as “the best mind of his generation” considers the state of modern America, entertainment and discipline, adulthood, literature, and his own inimitable writing style.
    In addition to Wallace’s last interview, the volume features a conversation with Dave Eggers, a revealing Q&A with the magazine of his alma mater Amherst, his famous Salon interview with Laura Miller following the publication of Infinite Jest, and more.
    These conversations showcase and illuminate the traits for which Wallace remains so beloved: his incomparable humility and enormous erudition, his wit, sensitivity, and humanity. As he eloquently describes his writing process and motivations, displays his curiosity by time and again turning the tables on his interviewers, and delivers thoughtful, idiosyncratic views on literature, politics, entertainment and discipline, and the state of modern America, a fuller picture of this remarkable mind is revealed.

  • The Pale King is David Foster Wallace's final novel - a testament to his enduring brilliance
    The Internal Revenue Service Regional Examination Centre in Peoria, Illinois, 1985. Here the minutaie of a million daily lives are totted up, audited and accounted for. Here the workers fight a never-ending war against the urgency of their own boredom. Here then, squeezed between the trivial and the quotidian, lies all human life. And this is David Foster Wallace's towering, brilliant, hilarious and deeply moving final novel.'Breathtakingly brilliant, funny, maddening and elegiac' New York Times'A bravura performance worthy of Woolf or Joyce. Wallace's finest work as a novelist' Time'Light-years beyond Infinite Jest. Wallace's reputation will only grow, and like one of the broken columns beloved of Romantic painters, The Pale King will stand, complete in its incompleteness, as his most substantial fictional achievement' Hari Kunzru, Financial Times'A paradise of language and intelligence' The Times'Archly brilliant' Metro
    'Teems with erudition and ideas, with passages of stylistic audacity, with great cheerful thrown-out gags, goofy puns and moments of truly arresting clarity. Innovative, penetrating, forcefully intelligent fiction like Wallace's arrives once in a generation, if that' Daily Telegraph'In a different dimension to the tepid vapidities that pass as novels these days. Sentence for sentence, almost word for word, Wallace could out-write any of his peers' Scotland on SundayDavid Foster Wallace wrote the novels Infinite Jest and The Broom of the System, and the short-story collections Oblivion, Brief Interviews with Hideous Men and Girl with Curious Hair. His non-fiction includes Consider the Lobster, A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again, Everything and More, This is Water and Both Flesh and Not. He died in 2008.

  • In his startling and singular new short story collection, David Foster Wallace nudges at the boundaries of fiction with inimitable wit and seductive intelligence. Among the stories are 'The Depressed Person', a dazzling and blackly humorous portrayal of a woman's mental state; 'Adult World', which reveals a woman's agonised consideration of her confusing sexual relationship with her husband; and 'Brief Interviews with Hideous Men', a dark, hilarious series of portraits of men whose fear of women renders them grotesque. Wallace's stories present a world where the bizarre and the banal are interwoven and where hideous men appear in many different guises. Thought-provoking and playful, this collection confirms David Foster Wallace as one of the most imaginative young writers around. Wallace delights in leftfield observation, mining the ironic, the surprising and the illuminating from every situation. His new collection will delight his growing number of fans, and provide a perfect introduction for new readers.

  • Do lobsters feel pain? Did Franz Kafka have a sick sense of humour? What is John Updike's deal anyway? And who won the Adult Video News' Female Performer of the Year Award the same year Gwyneth Paltrow won her Oscar? David Foster Wallace answers these questions and more in his new book of hilarious non-fiction.
    For this collection, David Foster Wallace immerses himself in the three-ring circus that is the presidential race in order to document one of the most vicious campaigns in recent history. Later he strolls from booth to booth at a lobster festival in Maine and risks life and limb to get to the bottom of the lobster question. Then he wheedles his way into an L.A. radio studio, armed with tubs of chicken, to get the behind-the-scenes view of a conservative talkshow featuring a host with an unnatural penchant for clothing that only looks good on the radio. In what is sure to be a much-talked-about exploration of distinctly modern subjects, one of the sharpest minds of our time delves into some of life's most delicious topics.

  • A collection of insightful and uproariously funny non-fiction by the bestselling author of INFINITE JEST - one of the most acclaimed and adventurous writers of our time. A SUPPOSEDLY FUN THING... brings together Wallace's musings on a wide range of topics, from his early days as a nationally ranked tennis player to his trip on a commercial cruiseliner. In each of these essays, Wallace's observations are as keen as they are funny. Filled with hilarious details and invigorating analyses, these essays brilliantly expose the fault line in American culture - and once again reveal David Foster Wallace's extraordinary talent and gargantuan intellect.

  • A visionary, a craftsman, a comedian ... He can do anything with a piece of prose, and it is a humbling experience to see him go to work on what has passed up till now as 'modern fiction'. He's so modern he's in a different time-space continuum from the rest of us. Goddamn him' ZADIE SMITHA recognised master of form and a brilliant recorder of human behaviour, David Foster Wallace has been hailed as 'the most significant writer of his generation' (TLS). Each new book confirms and extends his genius, and this new short story collection is no exception. In the stories that make up OBLIVION, David Foster Wallace conjoins the rawest, most naked humanity with the infinite convolutions of self-consciousness - a combination that is dazzlingly, uniquely his.'Wallace's talent is such that you can't help wondering: how good can he get?' TIME OUT

  • Somewhere in the not-so-distant future the residents of Ennet House, a Boston halfway house for recovering addicts, and students at the nearby Enfield Tennis Academy are ensnared in the search for the master copy of INFINITE JEST, a movie said to be so dangerously entertaining its viewers become entranced and expire in a state of catatonic bliss . . . 'Wallace's exuberance and intellectual impishness are a delight, and he has deep things to say about the hollowness of contemporary American pleasure . . . sentences and whole pages are marvels of cosmic concentration . . . Wallace is a superb comedian of culture'
    James Wood, GUARDIAN

  • Both Flesh and Not is an collection of essays and writing from the virtuosic genius David Foster Wallace
    Beloved for his brilliantly discerning eye, his verbal elasticity and his uniquely generous imagination, David Foster Wallace was heralded by critics and fans as the voice of a generation. Collected here are fifteen essays published for the first time in book form, including writing never published before in the UK.From 'Federer Both Flesh and Not', considered by many to be his non-fiction masterpiece; to 'The (As it Were) Seminal Importance of Terminator 2,' which deftly dissects James Cameron's blockbuster; to 'Fictional Futures and the Conspicuously Young', an examination of television's effect on a new generation of writers, the writing collected here swoops from erudite literary discussion to open-hearted engagement with the most familiar of our twentieth-century cultural references.A celebration of Wallace's great loves - for language, for precision, for meaning - and a feast of enjoyment for his fans, Both Flesh and Not is a fitting tribute to this writer who was never concerned with anything less important than what it means to be alive.Praise for David Foster Wallace:'A visionary, a craftsman, a comedian . . . he's in a different time-space continuum from the rest of us' Zadie Smith'Wallace's essays brim with cerebral energy, acute observation and fizzing wit. Enviably good' Sunday Times'Wallace's exuberance and intellectual impishness are a delight . . . a superb comedian of culture' Guardian, James WoodDavid Foster Wallace wrote the novels Infinite Jest and The Broom of the System, and the short-story collections Oblivion, Brief Interviews with Hideous Men and Girl with Curious Hair. His non-fiction includes Consider the Lobster, A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again, Everything and More, This is Water and Both Flesh and Not. He died in 2008.

  • In February 2000, "Rolling Stone" magazine sent David Foster Wallace, "NOT A POLITICAL JOURNALIST, " on the road for a week with Senator John McCain's campaign to win the Republican nomination for the Presidency. They wanted to know why McCain appealed so much to so many Americans, and particularly why he appealed to the "Young Voters" of America who generally show nothing but apathy.
    The "Director's Cut" (three times longer than the RS article) is an incisive, funny, thoughtful piece about life on "Bullshit One" -- the nickname for the press bus that followed McCain's Straight Talk Express.
    This piece becomes ever more relevant, as we discuss what we know, don't know, and don't want to know about the way our political campaigns work.

  • Is John McCain "For Real?"
    That's the question David Foster Wallace set out to explore when he first climbed aboard Senator McCain's campaign caravan in February 2000. It was a moment when Mccain was increasingly perceived as a harbinger of change, the anticandidate whose goal was "to inspire young Americans to devote themselves to causes greater than their own self-interest." And many young Americans were beginning to take notice.
    To get at "something riveting and unspinnable and true" about John Mccain, Wallace finds he must pierce the smoke screen of spin doctors and media manipulators. And he succeeds-in a characteristically potent blast of journalistic brio that not only captures the lunatic rough-and-tumble of a presidential campaign but also delivers a compelling inquiry into John McCain himself: the senator, the POW, the campaign finance reformer, the candidate, the man.

  • The David Foster Wallace Reader is a selection of David Foster Wallace's work, introducing readers to his humour, kindness, sweeping intellect and versatility as a writer.
    A compilation from the one of the most original writers of our age, featuring:· the very best of his fiction and non-fiction;
    · previously unpublished writing
    · and original contributions from 12 prominent authors and critics about his workFrom classic short fiction to genre-defining reportage, this book is a must for new readers and confirmed David Foster Wallace fans alike'One of the most dazzling luminaries of contemporary American fiction' Sunday Times'There are times, reading his work, when you get halfway through a sentence and gasp involuntarily, and for a second you feel lucky that there was, at least for a time, someone who could make sense like no other of what it is to be a human in our era' Daily Telegraph'A prose magician, Mr. Wallace was capable of writing . . .about subjects from tennis to politics to lobsters, from the horrors of drug withdrawal to the small terrors of life aboard a luxury cruise ship, with humour and fervour and verve' Michiko Kakutani, The New York TimesDavid Foster Wallace wrote the novels The Pale King, Infinite Jest, and The Broom of the System and three story collections. His nonfiction includes Consider the Lobster and A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again. He died in 2008.

  • Where do you begin with a writer as original and brilliant as David Foster Wallace? Here: with a carefully considered selection from his extraordinary body of work, chosen by a range of fellow writers, critics, and those who worked with him most closely. This volume presents both his funniest and his most heart-breaking work - essays such as his classic cruise-ship piece, 'A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again', excerpts from his novels The Broom of the System, Infinite Jest, and The Pale King, and legendary stories like 'The Depressed Person'. Collected for the first time are Wallace's first published story, 'The View from Planet Trillaphon as Seen In Relation to the Bad Thing' and a selection of his work as a professor of writing, including reading lists, grammar guides and the unique general guidelines he wrote for his students.A dozen writers and critics, including Hari Kunzru, Anne Fadiman, and Nam Le, add afterwords to favourite pieces, expanding our appreciation of the unique pleasures of Wallace's writing. The result is an astonishing volume that shows the breadth and range of 'one of the most dazzling luminaries of contemporary American fiction' (Sunday Times) whose work was full of humour, insight, and beauty.

  • Only once did David Foster Wallace give a public talk on his views on life, during a commencement address given in 2005 at Kenyon College. The speech is reprinted for the first time in book form in THIS IS WATER. How does one keep from going through their comfortable, prosperous adult life unconsciously? How do we get ourselves out of the foreground of our thoughts and achieve compassion? The speech captures Wallace's electric intellect as well as his grace in attention to others. After his death, it became a treasured piece of writing reprinted in The Wall Street Journal and the London Times, commented on endlessly in blogs, and emailed from friend to friend.
    Writing with his one-of-a-kind blend of causal humor, exacting intellect, and practical philosophy, David Foster Wallace probes the challenges of daily living and offers advice that renews us with every reading.

  • Une femme solitaire et déprimée lutte contre la maladie avec l'aide d'un thérapeute, d'une poignée d'amis proches et d'antidépresseurs. Dans cette nouvelle issue du recueil Brefs entretiens avec des hommes hideux (Au diable vauvert), Wallace s'inspire de ses angoisses avec un humour salvateur.

  • Deux enfants sont abandonnés sur une aire d'autoroute. Des années plus tard, sur le plateau du célèbre jeu télévisé Jeopardy, une jeune fille enchaîne les victoires. Issue du recueil La FIlle aux cheveux étranges (Au diable vauvert), cette nouvelle de Wallace est une histoire tragique sur l'amour, les relations familiales, le handicap et les secrets des divertissements du petit écran.

  • Cambridge, 1989. David Foster Wallace et son ami de fac Mark Costello découvrent qu'ils partagent le même enthousiasme « un peu inconfortable, quelque peu furtif, et très distinctement blanc » pour le rap. Prenant conscience avant tout le monde de l'ampleur du mouvement culturel, social et esthétique qui émerge, ils en tirent un livre qui définit les bipolarités du pop et du rap, entre rébellion et acceptation, extravagance et délinquance, critique et parodie. Ce sera un de leurs premiers livres, qui annonce le génie précurseur de leur oeuvre.

  • Lors de la tournée promotionnelle d'Infinite Jest, le chefd'oeuvre qui va lui conférer une gloire mondiale, David Foster Wallace digresse sur son époque - télévision, littérature, célébrité, sport, addictions. Audelà d'un entretien, une passionnante confession, intime et artistique.

  • Brilliant, dazzling, never-before-collected non-fiction, by the legendary David Foster Wallace

    Beloved for his wonderfully discerning eye, his verbal elasticity and his uniquely generous imagination, David Foster Wallace was heralded by critics and fans as the voice of a generation. Collected in Both Flesh and Not are fifteen essays published for the first time in book form.

    From 'Federer Both Flesh and Not', considered by many to be his nonfiction masterpiece; to 'The (As it Were) Seminal Importance of Terminator 2,' which deftly dissects James Cameron's blockbuster; to 'Fictional Futures and the Conspicuously Young', an examination of television's effect on a new generation of writers, David Foster Wallace's writing swoops from erudite literary discussion to open-hearted engagement with the most familiar of our twentieth-century cultural references.

    A celebration of David Foster Wallace's great loves - for language, for precision, for meaning - and a feast of enjoyment for his fans, Both Flesh and Not is a fitting tribute to this writer who was never concerned with anything less important than what it means to be alive.

    Praise for David Foster Wallace:

    'A visionary, a craftsman, a comedian . . . he's in a different time-space continuum from the rest of us.' Zadie Smith

    'Wallace's essays brim with cerebral energy, acute observation and fizzing wit. Enviably good.' Sunday Times

    'A prose magician . . . He could map the infinite and infinitesimal, the mythic and mundan.' Michiko Kakutani, New York Times



  • David Foster Wallace's last and most ambitious undertaking

    The agents at the IRS Regional Examination Center in Peoria, Illinois, appear ordinary to newly arrived trainee David Foster Wallace. But as he immerses himself in a routine so tedious and repetitive that new employees receive boredom-survival Wallace learns of the extraordinary variety of personalities drawn to this strange calling. And he has arrived at a moment when forces within the IRS are plotting to eliminate what little humanity and dignity the work still has.

    Imagined with the interior force and generosity that were David Foster Wallace's unique gifts, The Pale King grapples directly with ultimate questions - life's meaning, the value of work, the importance of connection - and commands infinite respect for one of the most daring writers of our time.



    'Overflows with Wallace's humour, compassion and, above all, his rolling, powerful, crashingly beautiful prose.' Sunday Times



    'Anyone who has read Wallace will know the thrilling, intimate experience of following one of his giant held breaths of attention and feeling it fill your mind with thoughts that feel like your own.' Sunday Age

    'One of the saddest and most lovely books I've ever read . . . D.F.W. writes sentences and sometimes whole pages that make you feel like you can't breathe . . . Let's state this clearly: You should read The Pale King.' Esquire

    'I started to think in Wallace-style sentences, and started to think that Wallace-style senteces are in fact the only sensible way of describing the world.' Sunday Times

  • Published when Wallace was just twenty-four years old, The Broom of the System stunned critics and marked the emergence of an extraordinary new talent. At the center of this outlandishly funny, fiercely intelligent novel is the bewitching heroine, Lenore Stonecipher Beadsman. The year is 1990 and the place is a slightly altered Cleveland, Ohio. Lenore’s great-grandmother has disappeared with twenty-five other inmates of the Shaker Heights Nursing Home. Her beau, and boss, Rick Vigorous, is insanely jealous, and her cockatiel, Vlad the Impaler, has suddenly started spouting a mixture of psycho-babble, Auden, and the King James Bible. Ingenious and entertaining, this debut from one of the most innovative writers of his generation brilliantly explores the paradoxes of language, storytelling, and reality.

empty