• A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers.
    Just after learning that his stepfather is gravely ill, artist Al Kinloch, returning to his remote home in the Scottish Highlands, is attacked by four men. They ask one question - 'where is it?' - then leave him for dead.
    Baffled and hurt, Al visits his stepfather and learns millions of pounds are missing and a valuable racehorse is under threat. Roughed up already, Al decides he has nothing to lose getting to the bottom of this.
    Unfortunately, the thugs who beat him up and the person behind them will make sure that Al doesn't survive their next encounter...
    Praise for Dick Francis:
    'As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing' Daily Mirror
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Francis writing at his best' Evening Standard
    'A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever' Sunday Express
    'A super chiller and killer' New York Times Book Review
    Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott.
    During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers' Association's Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three 'best novel' Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime's achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List of 2000.
    Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

  • This is a brilliant collection of thirteen short stories, written by the Master of Crime. Although some of the stories have been published before, all but one of them have had a very limited circulation and the vast majority of Dick Francis fans will be reading them for the first time. Ranging from the National Hunt Festival at Cheltenham to Churchill Downs in America, each of the stories contains an array of five-star Dick Francis characters, a brilliant plot to marvel over and an ingenious sting in the tail to gasp over.

  • 'Sadly, death at the races is not uncommon. However, three in a single afternoon was sufficiently unusual to raise more than an eyebrow.'It's the third death on Cheltenham Gold Cup Day that really troubles super-sleuth Sid Halley. Former champion jockey Halley knows the perils of racing all too well - but in his day, jockeys didn't usually reach the finishing line with three .38 rounds in the chest. But this is precisely how he finds jockey Huw Walker - who, only a few hours earlier, had won the coveted Triumph Hurdle.Just moments before the gruesome discovery, Halley had been called upon by Lord Enstone to make discrete enquiries into why his horses appeared to be on a permanent losing streak. Are races being fixed? Are bookies taking a cut? And if so, are trainers and jockeys playing a dangerous game with stakes far higher than they realise? Halley's quest for answers draws him ever deeper into the darker side of the race game, in a life-or-death power play that will push him to his very limits - both professionally and personally.In his first new novel for six years, Dick Francis returns to prove once again that he is the Grand Master of thriller writing.

  • A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers.
    Jockey Kit Fielding's patron, Princess Casilia, is in trouble. Her invalid husband is being threatened by a ruthless business partner who wants to use the firm to manufacture arms. At the same time, some of the Princess's best horses are being killed - shot by a bolt.
    The only person the Princess can turn to is Kit - but he has problems of his own. His fiance Danielle has taken a shine to another man. And his old feud with Maynard Allardeck, racing steward and hereditary enemy of the Fieldings, might lose him his license to race.
    Between riding winners (and trying to save his impending marriage) Kit has somehow to find out and stop who is slaughtering the horses.
    But, as he's about to discover, the killer has more than horses in his sights . . .
    Praise for Dick Francis:
    'As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing' Daily Mirror
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Francis writing at his best' Evening Standard
    'A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever' Sunday Express
    Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott.
    During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers' Association's Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three 'best novel' Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime's achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List of 2000.
    Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

  • Free choice? There's no such thing, according to Lee Morris. Choice is pre-ordained by your personality. Stratton Park racecourse faces ruin in the hands of a squabbling family. Lee is slowly sucked into the turmoil, unwillingly on the surface but half-understanding the deep compulsions that influence his decisions. One road leads to safety, another to death. How do you know which is which? Lee's choices and their consequences bring deadly results, but the road out of the quicksand is there, if he can find it. Horses and racing are familiar ingredients, but this time there are also children, houses, roots and decisions. Danger? Naturally. Stratton Park racecourse is worth multi-millions, and all of the Stratton family are playing to win.

  • A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers.
    Champion jockey Sid Halley retired from racing when his hand was smashed in a fall. Now he works as a private detective - which is proving to be no less dangerous to life and limb.
    Recuperating from a bullet wound, Sid is asked by his father-in-law to look into some potentially shady activity involving Seabury racecourse and a ruthless property dealer.
    But the closer Sid gets to those determined to get their hands on Seabury, the more he finds himself in harm's way. The odds are against him - but that's exactly when Sid is at his best...
    Praise for Dick Francis:
    'As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing' Daily Mirror
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Francis writing at his best' Evening Standard
    'A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever' Sunday Express
    'A super chiller and killer' New York Times Book Review
    Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott.
    During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers' Association's Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three 'best novel' Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime's achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List of 2000.
    Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

  • Anglais Wild Horses

    Dick Francis

    Valentine, a blind, confused and dying old man, seeking his peace with God, makes his last confession to a visiting friend, Thoms Lyon, mistaking him for a priest. Thomas, in Newmarket to research for a new film, is placed in a moral dilemma. Wild horses wouldn't drag from a priest the secrets of the confessional - but then Thomas is not a priest. Should he tell what he knows from the confession, or not? He discovers that the solution to his quandary could mean the difference between life and death. WILD HORSES is a masterly mix of convincing characters, fine writing and an inscrutable and ingenious plot.

  • Tor Kelsey, an undercover agent for the Jockey Club's security service is involved in the attempt to rid racing of one of its most notorious villains, Julius Apollo Filmer. The court however, does not go along with their beliefs, but Tor knows that to let Julius even suspect the service are still on his tail would mean certain death for a number of witnesses. Meanwhile, several racehorse owners have planned a luxurious train trip across Canada, with race meetings fixed for every major city. Julius Apollo Filmer and Tor are on the passenger list. The beautiful journey through the Rockies gets uglier by the minute and Tor finds himself pushed to dangerous limits to defeat Filmer's wily scheming.

  • Anglais Trial Run

    Dick Francis

    A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers.Ex-steeplechaser Randall Drew is reluctantly off to pre-Olympic games Moscow, as a favour to royalty. One of the blue bloods is destined to compete in the games and there are concerns - both of safety and of scandal - that only Drew, with his racing connections, can clear up. On arriving - speaking no Russian and wishing he were back home - Drew is supposed to identify and contact one Alyosha to clear up the scandal. Instead, he finds himself tailed by the KGB and embroiled in foiling a terrorist plot - or die trying.Home seems an awful long way away - and if he's not careful, he'll be going back in a box . . .Praise for Dick Francis:
    'As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing'Daily Mirror
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Francis writing at his best' Evening Standard
    'A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever' Sunday ExpressDick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott. During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers' Association's Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three 'best novel' Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime's achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List of 2000. Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

  • Shattered is a classic novel from Dick Francis, one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.
    Cheltenham Races, New Year's Eve. Gerard Logan witnesses the death of his close friend, jockey Martin Stukely, after a fall from his horse. In the aftermath, Gerard is left to pick up the pieces - including a mysterious unmarked videotape that Martin secretly left him.But before Gerard gets to watch it, the videotape is stolen.And soon further crimes against Gerard and those close to him start to occur. What was on the missing videotape? And why are the attacks continuing?In order to stay alive, Gerard needs to keep one step ahead of his enemies and uncover the truth - before his livelihood and everything he loves is shattered for good.Packed with intrigue and hair-raising suspense, Shattered is one of the many blockbuster thrillers from legendary crime writer Dick Francis. Other novels include the huge bestsellers Dead Heat, Under Orders and Silks. The Dick Francis legacy continues through his son Felix Francis: Refusal is his latest novel, following Bloodline and Gamble.Praise for the Dick Francis novels:
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'Still the master' Racing Post
    'The master of suspense and intrigue' Country LifeDick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott. Dick Francis died in February, 2010, at the age of 89, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

  • Dead Cert is a classic mystery from Dick Francis, one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.
    'Admiral met the fence perfectly. He rose to it as if flight were not only for birds. And he fell.'Alan York's friend, jockey Bill Davidson, was killed in Admiral's fall. After the race, York visits the fence and discovers a coil of wire lying beside the fence post and signs of where the wire had been attached.The fall was no accident - but murder.Unable to convince the police of this, York is forced to turn amateur sleuth and is soon on the trail of a ruthless gang of race-fixers operating out of Brighton.Now Alan's caught in a new race: find the gang's leaders before the gang catches up with him . . .
    Packed with intrigue and hair-raising suspense, Dead Cert is just one of the many blockbuster thrillers from legendary crime writer Dick Francis. Other novels include the huge bestsellers Dead Heat, Under Orders and Silks. The Dick Francis legacy continues through his son Felix Francis: Refusal is his latest novel, following Bloodline and Gamble.Praise for the Dick Francis novels:
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'Still the master' Racing Post
    'The master of suspense and intrigue' Country LifeDick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott. Dick Francis died in February, 2010, at the age of 89, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

  • A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers.
    When inventor Stephen Scott abruptly fires his winning trainer Jody Leeds, the racing world is shocked and disgusted - though not quite as angry as Leeds, who swears revenge on his former friend.
    But Steven is convinced that Leeds has been stealing from him - and worse - and felt he had no choice. And when Leeds decides to enact his vengance, Steven finds out just what a nasty piece of work he really is.
    Because now Steven is not only in fear of losing everything - but also his life. Somehow, he must prove to the world that Leeds is a vicious crook - or die trying . . .
    Praise for Dick Francis:
    'As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing' Daily Mirror
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Francis writing at his best' Evening Standard
    'A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever' Sunday Express
    'A super chiller and killer' New York Times Book Review
    Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott.
    During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers' Association's Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three 'best novel' Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime's achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List of 2000.
    Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

  • A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers.
    Steeplechase jockey Kit Fielding has just ridden another winner for his patron - the Princess - when his distraught twin sister Holly comes to him with terrible news. A newspaper is printing stories which will put her husband, Bobby Allardeck, and his stables out of business.
    Putting aside the age-old Fielding-Allardeck feud, Kit decides to try to find out who is behind these cruel stories.
    This, he quickly discovers, puts a lot of noses out of joint. Not one to be put off easily, he keeps digging, upsetting powerful and ruthless people who'll do anything to protect themselves.
    But this is family and Kit will risk everything - including his neck - to find the truth. . .
    Praise for Dick Francis:
    'As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing' Daily Mirror
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Francis writing at his best' Evening Standard
    'A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever' Sunday Express
    Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott.
    During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers' Association's Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three 'best novel' Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime's achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List of 2000.
    Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

  • Anglais For Kicks

    Dick Francis

    A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers.
    Daniel Roke owns a stud farm in Australia. He's young, smart, hard-working and desperate for some excitement - all of which makes him the ideal candidate for the Earl of October, who has come visiting.
    The Earl is concerned about a horse-doping scandal that is destroying English racing. He wants to pay Daniel to come back with him, pose as a highly corruptible stable lad and discover who is behind it.
    Unfortunately, when Daniel agrees he doesn't realise how close he'll have to get to find the truth. Nor how determined the criminals will be to prevent him living long enough to tell anyone...
    Praise for Dick Francis:
    'As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing' Daily Mirror
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Francis writing at his best' Evening Standard
    'A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever' Sunday Express
    'A super chiller and killer' New York Times Book Review
    Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott.
    During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers' Association's Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three 'best novel' Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime's achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List of 2000.
    Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

  • A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers.
    Charles Todd, a successful artist who paints horses, arrives at his cousin Donald's house and stumbles on a grisly scene: police cars everywhere, his cousin arrested for murder and Donald's wife brutally slain.
    Believing - unlike the police - Donald's story of a burglary gone wrong, Charles follows clues which lead him from England to Australia and a diabolical scheme involving fraud and murder.
    But soon Charles realises that someone is on his trail. Someone who wants to make sure that Charles won't live long enough to save Donald.
    Praise for Dick Francis:
    'As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing' Daily Mirror
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Francis writing at his best' Evening Standard
    'A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever' Sunday Express
    'A super chiller and killer' New York Times Book Review
    Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott.
    During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers' Association's Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three 'best novel' Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime's achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List of 2000.
    Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

  • Anglais Proof

    Dick Francis

    A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers.
    Wine merchant Tony Beach will do anything for a quiet life. But when a party to celebrate the end of the racing season ends in eight violent deaths, he is drawn reluctantly into the subsequent investigation.
    Meanwhile, the police, having evidence of the sale of illicit alcohol at a local club, ask for Tony's help in closing it down. Thanks to his intervention, Tony comes to the attention of the criminal underworld.
    And that's when he reluctantly realizes that the deaths and the illicit alcohol are connected.
    Tony doesn't want to be a hero. But if the choice is that or dying...
    Praise for Dick Francis:
    'As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing' Daily Mirror
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Francis writing at his best' Evening Standard
    'A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever' Sunday Express
    'A super chiller and killer' New York Times Book Review
    Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott.
    During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers' Association's Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three 'best novel' Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime's achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List of 2000.
    Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

  • Anglais Slay Ride

    Dick Francis

    A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers.
    David Cleveland - an investigator for the Jockey Club - is sitting in a dinghy in a pleasant little fjord in Norway. He's here to help the Norwegians find out why Bob Sherman, a visiting English rider, has done a runner with the racehorse takings.
    He thinks it'll be a straightforward job, and he'll get to spend some time with old friends.
    But when the dinghy is hit by a speedboat and Cleveland almost drowns, he realizes that there is more to this case than some missing money - especially when a dead body turns up.
    Now Cleveland knows the stakes are dangerously high. A sensible man would leave it to the police and go back home to England. Except, it turns out, that England isn't safe either . . .
    Praise for Dick Francis:
    'As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing' Daily Mirror
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Francis writing at his best' Evening Standard
    'A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever' Sunday Express
    Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott.
    During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers' Association's Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three 'best novel' Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime's achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List of 2000.
    Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

  • Anglais Enquiry

    Dick Francis

    Enquiry is a classic novel from Dick Francis, one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.When Kelly Hughes rides the favourite into second place, he gets penalized for his trouble. Not only has he lost the race, but also his licence, as the Jockey Club suspends him - believing he threw the race.Only he knows that the problem lay with the horse's performance, not his own. Suspecting he was framed, Kelly sets about finding out how it was done, and then who might have done it.But the closer he gets to the perpetrators, the more danger he finds himself in. Now there's more than his reputation and career at stake.There's also his life . . .Packed with intrigue and hair-raising suspense, Enquiry is just one of the many blockbuster thrillers from legendary crime writer Dick Francis. Other novels include the huge bestsellers Dead Heat, Under Orders and Silks. The Dick Francis legacy continues through his son Felix Francis: Refusal is his latest novel, following Bloodline and Gamble.Praise for the Dick Francis novels:
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'Still the master' Racing Post
    'The master of suspense and intrigue' Country LifeDick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott. Dick Francis died in February, 2010, at the age of 89, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

  • A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers.
    Malcolm Pembroke didn't get rich without making a few enemies - not least among the five wives and nine children left like wreckage in his wake.
    But when Moira, his fifth wife, is murdered and Malcolm believes that someone is out to get him, he knows of only one person he can turn to: his estranged son, Ian.
    Ian - an amateur jockey - wants nothing to do with his father until it becomes clear the old man's life is in danger. And worst of all the evidence suggests it's from someone in the family.
    Can Ian work out who it is before they strike again?
    Praise for Dick Francis:
    'As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing' Daily Mirror
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Francis writing at his best' Evening Standard
    'A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever' Sunday Express
    'A super chiller and killer' New York Times Book Review
    Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott.
    During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers' Association's Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three 'best novel' Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime's achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List of 2000.
    Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

  • A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers.
    Matt Shore is a pilot down on his luck. Once he'd flown big jets and dropped supplies in war zones. Now he's ferrying high-class passengers between English race courses.
    But when one eventful trip ends with his plane exploding in a ball of fire, Matt knows he's not that unlucky.
    When the police confirm it was a bomb, Matt realizes he has a problem. One of his passengers must have been the target - the question is who?
    Matt to find out fast - because he's scheduled to ferry the same people over the coming weeks.
    Can Matt stay alive long enough to stop the bomber?
    Praise for Dick Francis:
    'As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing' Daily Mirror
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Francis writing at his best' Evening Standard
    'A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever' Sunday Express
    Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott.
    During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers' Association's Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three 'best novel' Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime's achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List of 2000.
    Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

  • Anglais Smokescreen

    Dick Francis

    A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers.
    Edward Lincoln has scaled the Himalayas, survived deadly car chases and defeated scores of assassins. As a movie action man he's even suffered stoically at the hands of sadistic directors.
    After finishing his latest film, he's asked to visit South Africa to discover why a dying friend's horses are suddenly failing on the race track. Unfortunately, Lincoln's attempt to help a friend soon puts him in harm's way. From a nearly fatal interview to a dangerous accident in a gold mine, it seems only luck is keeping him alive.
    And in life, unlike the big-screen, there's no coming back from dead . . .
    Praise for Dick Francis:
    'As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing' Daily Mirror
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Francis writing at his best' Evening Standard
    'A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever' Sunday Express
    Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott.
    During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers' Association's Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three 'best novel' Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime's achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List of 2000.
    Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

  • Knock Down is a classic novel from Dick Francis, one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.Jonah Dereham is a bloodstock agent who buys and sells horses for his clients. As an ex-jockey, it's the ideal quiet life - until Jonah is attacked by thugs out to sabotage his business.Unfortunately for them, Jonah's a man with a steely resolve. He's determined to find out who is trying to ruin him, and why.But staying honest is more dangerous than Jonah could have imagined.And with his horses, his business and his own life on the line, Jonah must hit back - before he's taken down for good . . .Packed with intrigue and hair-raising suspense, Knock Down is just one of the many blockbuster thrillers from legendary crime writer Dick Francis. Other novels include the huge bestsellers Dead Heat, Under Orders and Silks. The Dick Francis legacy continues through his son Felix Francis: Refusal is his latest novel, following Bloodline and Gamble.Praise for the Dick Francis novels:
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'Still the master' Racing Post
    'The master of suspense and intrigue' Country LifeDick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott. Dick Francis died in February, 2010, at the age of 89, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

  • Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott.
    During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers' Association's Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three 'best novel' Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime's achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List of 2000.
    Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.
    Praise for Dick Francis:
    'As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing'Daily Mirror
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Francis writing at his best' Evening Standard
    'A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever' Sunday Express
    'A super chiller and killer' New York Times Book Review

  • Flying Finish is a classic novel from Dick Francis, one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.Amateur jockey Lord Henry Grey decides on a whim to join the bloodstock market, transporting racehorses around the world. And when he meets the glamorous Gabriella in Italy, he is sure he's hit the good life.That is, until a horse unexpectedly dies in transit and a colleague vanishes.Then Grey discovers that both his predecessors also went missing in curious cirmcumstances - and begins to doubt the wisdom of his career change.Either he turns detective or his own disappearance could be next . . .Packed with intrigue and hair-raising suspense, Flying Finish is just one of the many blockbuster thrillers from legendary crime writer Dick Francis. Other novels include the huge bestsellers Dead Heat, Under Orders and Silks. The Dick Francis legacy continues through his son Felix Francis: Refusal is his latest novel, following Bloodline and Gamble.Praise for the Dick Francis novels:
    'The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman
    'Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph
    'Still the master' Racing Post
    'The master of suspense and intrigue' Country LifeDick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott. Dick Francis died in February, 2010, at the age of 89, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

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