• Are we born with our fears or do we learn them? Why do our fears persist? What purpose does anxiety serve? How common are anxiety disorders, and which treatments are most effective? What's happening in our brain when we feel fear? And what are Colombian worry dolls?

    This Very Short Introduction draws on the best scientific research to offer a highly accessible explanation of what anxiety is, why it is such a normal and vital part of our emotional life, and the key factors that cause it. Insights are drawn from psychology, neuroscience, genetics, epidemiology, and clinical trials. Providing a fascinating illustration of the discussion are two interviews conducted specifically for the book, with the actor, writer, director, and television presenter Michael Palin and former England football manager Graham Taylor.

    The book covers in detail the six major anxiety disorders: phobias; panic disorder and agoraphobia; social anxiety; generalised anxiety disorder; obsessive compulsive disorder; and post-traumatic stress disorder. With a chapter devoted to each disorder, Daniel and Jason Freeman take you through the symptoms, prevalence, and causes of each one. A final chapter describes the treatments available for dealing with anxiety problems.

    ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

  • Are we born with our fears or do we learn them? Why do our fears persist? What purpose does anxiety serve? How common are anxiety disorders, and which treatments are most effective? What's happening in our brain when we feel fear? And what are Colombian worry dolls?

    This Very Short Introduction draws on the best scientific research to offer a highly accessible explanation of what anxiety is, why it is such a normal and vital part of our emotional life, and the key factors that cause it. Insights are drawn from psychology, neuroscience, genetics, epidemiology, and clinical trials. Providing a fascinating illustration of the discussion are two interviews conducted specifically for the book, with the actor, writer, director, and television presenter Michael Palin and former England football manager Graham Taylor.

    The book covers in detail the six major anxiety disorders: phobias; panic disorder and agoraphobia; social anxiety; generalised anxiety disorder; obsessive compulsive disorder; and post-traumatic stress disorder. With a chapter devoted to each disorder, Daniel and Jason Freeman take you through the symptoms, prevalence, and causes of each one. A final chapter describes the treatments available for dealing with anxiety problems.

    ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

  • Every day millions of people struggle with psychological and emotional problems. The Stressed Sex sets out to answer a simple, but crucial, question: are rates of psychological disorder different for men and women? The implications - for individuals and society alike - are far-reaching, and to date, this important issue has been largely ignored in all the debates raging about gender differences.

    Now Daniel Freeman and Jason Freeman present a ground-breaking combination of epidemiological analysis and evidence-based science to get to the bottom of what's really going on. They discover which mental health problems are more common in men, and which are seen most often in women. And, in a finding that is sure to provoke lively debate, they reveal that, in any given year, women experience higher rates of psychological disorder than men. Why might this be the case? The Stressed Sex explains current scientific thinking on the possible reasons - and considers what might be done to address the imbalance.

  • Are we living in a uniquely paranoid age? Catalysed by the threat of terrorism, fears about others have reached a new intensity. The roll call of apparent dangers seems to increase by the day: muggers, child abductors, drug dealers, hoodied teenagers. Crime has apparently reached such high levels that CCTV cameras are required in every town centre, and parents are so fearful that many children never go out alone.

    Until recently, no one suspected just how common paranoia was. But new research suggests that around a quarter of us have regular paranoid thoughts, and probably lots more have them occasionally. Paranoia is so prevalent that there>'s a very good chance that all of us will, at some point in our lives, be among the 25%.

    Yet, although paranoia is as common as depression or anxiety, most of us know almost nothing about it. What is paranoia? What causes it? Are some people more prone to paranoia than others? Are we more paranoid now than we used to be? How should we deal with our paranoid thoughts? And how can we reduce the amount of paranoia in our society? Co-written by one of the world>'s leading psychologists of paranoia, and drawing on the latest scientific research, this lively and accessible book answers these key questions, highlighting for the first time the central role of paranoia in our world today.

  • Are we living in a uniquely paranoid age? Catalysed by the threat of terrorism, fears about others have reached a new intensity. The roll call of apparent dangers seems to increase by the day: muggers, child abductors, drug dealers, hoodied teenagers. Crime has apparently reached such high levels that CCTV cameras are required in every town centre, and parents are so fearful that many children never go out alone.

    Until recently, no one suspected just how common paranoia was. But new research suggests that around a quarter of us have regular paranoid thoughts, and probably lots more have them occasionally. Paranoia is so prevalent that there>'s a very good chance that all of us will, at some point in our lives, be among the 25%.

    Yet, although paranoia is as common as depression or anxiety, most of us know almost nothing about it. What is paranoia? What causes it? Are some people more prone to paranoia than others? Are we more paranoid now than we used to be? How should we deal with our paranoid thoughts? And how can we reduce the amount of paranoia in our society? Co-written by one of the world>'s leading psychologists of paranoia, and drawing on the latest scientific research, this lively and accessible book answers these key questions, highlighting for the first time the central role of paranoia in our world today.

  • Every day millions of people struggle with psychological and emotional problems. The Stressed Sex sets out to answer a simple, but crucial, question: are rates of psychological disorder different for men and women? The implications - for individuals and society alike - are far-reaching, and to date, this important issue has been largely ignored in all the debates raging about gender differences.

    Now Daniel Freeman and Jason Freeman present a ground-breaking combination of epidemiological analysis and evidence-based science to get to the bottom of what's really going on. They discover which mental health problems are more common in men, and which are seen most often in women. And, in a finding that is sure to provoke lively debate, they reveal that, in any given year, women experience higher rates of psychological disorder than men. Why might this be the case? The Stressed Sex explains current scientific thinking on the possible reasons - and considers what might be done to address the imbalance.

  • 'This is the definitive practical guide from the leaders in the field on a hugely important topic. Written in an engaging, easy-to-understand style, the book tells how new research on paranoia is revealing how best to overcome it. The first edition helped many thousands of sufferers and the second edition promises even more.' Mark Williams, Emeritus Professor of Clinical Psychology, University of Oxford, co-author of Mindfulness: Finding Peace in a Frantic World'The authors of this excellent and timely book have played a major role in developing our understanding of how suspicious thoughts arise and, crucially, how we can learn to cope with them.' Nicholas Tarier, Professor of Clinical Psychology, Manchester UniversityLearn how to overcome your feelings of paranoiaDo you feel as if others are out to get you? Research shows that 20-30 percent of people in the UK frequently have paranoid or suspicious thoughts about other people. These feelings can make life a misery.In this fully revised and expanded new edition, the authors explain how cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) techniques can be used to treat this disorder by changing unhelpful patterns of behaviour and thought. Overcoming self-help guides use clinically proven CBT techniques to treat long-standing and disabling conditions, both psychological and physical. Many guides in the Overcoming series are recommended under the Reading Well Books on Prescription scheme.

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