• Le livre

    Nous sommes à Dublin dans les années soixante, années, rappelons-le, au cours desquelles se déroulent les premiers affrontements sanglants entre catholiques et protestants. La violence se propage à travers toute l'Irlande. À l'image de son pays, Hugo Hamilton est en état de guerre, mais lui, c'est avec son père. Le conflit entre ces deux-là s'achèvera par la victoire du fils. Il y a eu guerre, il y aura encore reniement.
    Le jeune Hamilton, honteux d'avoir une mère allemande, s'évertuera à éradiquer de son esprit tout ce qui la concerne, toute la culture qu'elle a cherché à lui transmettre. Il aspire à perdre toute identité, à se libérer de toute influence, à devenir le fils de personne. Mieux : il quitte l'Irlande afin de découvrir le monde, se rend en Angleterre et en Allemagne. Et cet exil volontaire lui fera enfin comprendre que son épanouissement ne passe que par l'acceptation de ses origines irlandaise et germanique.
    L'auteur
    Hugo Hamilton est né à Dublin en 1953, d'une mère allemande et d'un père irlandais. Journaliste de talent, il se lance très vite dans l'écriture de nouvelles et de romans. Il devra attendre la parution de Sang impur (prix Femina étranger, 2004, Phébus) pour être reconnu comme l'un des plus grands auteurs de son pays. Les Éditions Phébus ont publié la plupart de ses romans : Le Marin de Dublin (Phébus, 2007 ; Points, 2008), Berlin sous la Baltique (Libretto, 2005), Déjanté (Phébus, 2006 ; Points, 2009), Triste flic (Phébus, 2008 ; Points 2010), Comme personne (Phébus, 2010).

  • Au gré de leurs pérégrinations dans Berlin, Liam et Úna se retrouvent. Úna est atteinte d'un cancer. Ce sera son dernier voyage.
    Chacun fait don à l'autre de sa propre histoire et de ses secrets avec pudeur, franchise, humour et tendresse. Úna rêve d'assister à une représentation du Don Carlos de Verdi, dont le personnage principal lui rappelle son frère aujourd'hui disparu. Liam, quant à lui, est obnubilé par le mariage de sa fille auquel, par égoïsme, il s'oppose.
    On ne peut, en lisant ce texte, ne pas penser à l'infinie tendresse qui liait Hugo Hamilton à la grande romancière irlandaise Nuala O'Faolain, qui s'est éteinte en 2008. Un voyage qui résonne comme un hommage, comme le témoignage d'une vibrante amitié : une vérité qui fait de ce livre l'un des plus émouvants d'Hugo Hamilton, l'un des plus intimes aussi.
    Hugo Hamilton est né à Dublin en 1953, d'une mère allemande et d'un père irlandais. Journaliste de talent, il se lance très vite dans l'écriture de nouvelles et de romans. Il devra attendre la parution de Sang impur (prix Femina étranger, 2004, Phébus) pour être reconnu comme l'un des plus grands auteurs de son pays. Les Éditions Phébus ont publié la plupart de ses romans : Le Marin de Dublin (Phébus, 2007 ; Points, 2008), Berlin sous la Baltique (Libretto, 2005), Déjanté (Phébus, 2006 ; Points, 2009), Triste flic (Phébus, 2008 ; Points 2010), Comme personne (Phébus, 2010).


  • You have a funny way of doing things here.
    The voice is that of Vid Cosic, a Serbian immigrant whose immediate friendship with a young Dublin lawyer, Kevin Concannon, is overshadowed by a violent incident in which a man is left for dead in the street one night. The legal fallout forces them into an ever closer, uncertain partnership, drawing Vid right into the Concannon family, working for them as a carpenter on a major renovation project and becoming more and more involved in their troubled family story.
    While he claims to have lost his own memory in a serious accident back home in Serbia, he cannot help investigating the emerging details of a young woman from Connemara who was denounced by the church and whose pregnant body was washed up on the Aran Islands many years ago. Was it murder or suicide? And what dark impact does this event in the past still have on the Concannon family now?
    As the deadly echo of hatred and violence begins to circle closer around them, Vid finds this spectacular Irish friendship coming under increasing threat with fatal consequences.
    Drawing his own speckled, Irish-German background, Hugo Hamilton has given us a highly compelling and original view of contemporary Ireland, the nature of welcome and the uneasy trespassing into a new country.

  • Anglais Disguise

    Hugo Hamilton


    Hugo Hamilton, the internationally acclaimed author of 'The Speckled People' and 'Sailor in the Wardrobe', turns his hand back to fiction with a compelling drama tracing Berlin's central historical importance throughout the twentieth century.
    1945. At the end of the second world war in Berlin, a young mother loses her two-year-old boy in the bombings. She flees to the south, where her father finds a young foundling of the same age among the refugee trains to replace the boy. He makes her promise never to tell anyone, including her husband - still fighting on the Russian front - that the boy is not her own. Nobody will know the difference.
    2008. Gregor Liedmann is a Jewish man now in his sixties. He's an old rocker who ran away from home, a trumpet player, a revolutionary stone-thrower left over from the 1968 generation. On a single day spent gathering fruit in an orchard outside Berlin with family and friends, Gregor looks back over his life, sifting through fact and memory in order to establish the truth. What happened on that journey south in the final days of the war? Why did his grandfather Emil disappear, and why did the Gestapo torture uncle Max? Here, in the calmness of the orchard, along with his ex-wife Mara and son Daniel, Gregor tries to unlock the secret of his past.
    In his first novel since the best-selling memoir The Speckled People, Hugo Hamilton has created a truly compelling story of lost identity, and a remarkable reflection on the ambiguity of belonging.


  • 'This is the most gripping book I've read in ages ... It is beautifully written, fascinating, disturbing and often very funny.' Roddy Doyle
    The childhood world of Hugo Hamilton, born and brought up in Dublin, is a confused place. His father, a sometimes brutal Irish nationalist, demands his children speak Gaelic, while his mother, a softly spoken German emigrant who has been marked by the Nazi past, speaks to them in German. He himself wants to speak English. English is, after all, what the other children in Dublin speak. English is what they use when they hunt him down in the streets and dub him Eichmann, as they bring him to trial and sentence him to death at a mock seaside court.
    Out of this fear and guilt and often comical cultural entanglements, he tries to understand the differences between Irish history and German history and turn the twisted logic of what he is told into truth. It is a journey that ends in liberation, but not before he uncovers the long-buried secrets that lie at the bottom of his parents wardrobe.
    In one of the finest books to have emerged from Ireland in many years, the acclaimed novelist Hugo Hamilton has finally written his own story - a deeply moving memoir about a whole family's homesickness for a country they can call their own.


  • Following on from the success of 'The Speckled People', Hugo Hamilton's new memoir recounts the summer he spent working at a local harbour in Ireland, at a time of tremendous fear and mistrust.


  • In this remarkable book, Hugo Hamilton tells the story of individuals caught up in the turbulent last days of World War II.


  • 'Not only haunted by death, but also by beauty and the strangeness of being alive. A deeply memorable novel' Colm Toibín
    '... I have friends and family, I am in this wonderful country, I have money, there is nothing much wrong with me except I am dying.'
    Osna has little over a week left to live and wants to see Berlin for the first and last time. Her friend Liam accompanies her. As the city streets open up to them, so too do their pasts. Osna recalls her life - her lovers, her famous father, her alcoholic mother and the death of her younger brother. For Liam the weekend becomes a lesson in true living from a friend he is about to lose.

empty