• En croisant deux thèmes, celui de la frontière et celui de l'unité de l'océan, ce livre isole trois grandes périodes chronologiques depuis 1784, date de l'arrivée en Chine du premier navire battant pavillon américain. La première, qui va jusqu'aux lendemains de la guerre de Sécession, correspond à la « grande frontière », où les activités américaines couvrent tout l'espace maritime. La seconde, qui s'étend des années 1860 à Pearl Harbor (1941), voit à la fois la contraction du domaine où se déploient les divers intérêts américains et la résorption progressive de la frontière. Avec la Seconde Guerre mondiale débute enfin la troisième période, celle que nous connaissons encore actuellement, où le Pacifique dans son ensemble devient un lac américain et où l'ancienne frontière tend à disparaître.
    Ainsi, si l'histoire de la frontière suit une évolution relativement rectiligne, il n'en va pas de même de celle du Pacifique américain, qui présente une alternance d'expansion et de repli. De cette imbrication naît un mouvement complexe dont l'auteur analyse les différentes trajectoires.

  • Cet ouvrage est une réédition numérique d'un livre paru au XXe siècle, désormais indisponible dans son format d'origine.

  • En croisant deux thèmes, celui de la frontière et celui de l'unité de l'océan, ce livre isole trois grandes périodes chronologiques depuis 1784, date de l'arrivée en Chine du premier navire battant pavillon américain. La première, qui va jusqu'aux lendemains de la guerre de Sécession, correspond à la « grande frontière », où les activités américaines couvrent tout l'espace maritime. La seconde, qui s'étend des années 1860 à Pearl Harbor (1941), voit à la fois la contraction du domaine où se déploient les divers intérêts américains et la résorption progressive de la frontière. Avec la Seconde Guerre mondiale débute enfin la troisième période, celle que nous connaissons encore actuellement, où le Pacifique dans son ensemble devient un lac américain et où l'ancienne frontière tend à disparaître.
    Ainsi, si l'histoire de la frontière suit une évolution relativement rectiligne, il n'en va pas de même de celle du Pacifique américain, qui présente une alternance d'expansion et de repli. De cette imbrication naît un mouvement complexe dont l'auteur analyse les différentes trajectoires.

  • Pendant la guerre de Sécession, le port de New York a atteint son apogée relatif dans le commerce extérieur américain. Cependant la fin de ces conditions exceptionnelles ne marque pas le retour au statu quo car, désormais, jusqu'à la fin du XIXe siècle, le roi-coton doit partager sa couronne avec les céréales. Si New York maintient son hégémonie aux importations, il voit sa suprématie contestée aux exportations, principalement de grains, par ses riveaux les plus proches, Boston, Philadelphie et Baltimore. L'objet de cet ouvrage est l'analyse de la rivalité entre ports pour la domination du commerce des États-Unis, à un moment où ce pays devient le grenier de l'Europe industrielle. Une fois établis les faits, est proposée une gamme d'interprétations, qui s'appuient sur des modèles partiels ou sur les arguments avancés par les contemporains, afin de jeter quelques lumières sur la hiérarchie des causes.

  • Cet ouvrage, troisième version de L'Amérique anglo-saxonne de 1815 à nos jours, apporte trente ans plus tard une nouvelle interprétation historique. En adoptant des nouvelles méthodes pour étudier de nouveaux « objets », les historiens ont fait émerger des champs de recherche inconnus et transformé la perception de l'histoire des deux pays. Les auteurs présentent les problématiques, les approches et acquis récents, liés à l'emprise des sciences sociales sur cette discipline, les apports multiples de l'historiographie américaine et canadienne.

  • "Be in no doubt: the beer was drunk but the man drank the beer.""We must avoid vulgarities like 'front up'. If someone is 'fronting up' a television show, then he is presenting it."Simon Heffer's incisive and amusingly despairing emails to colleagues at the The Daily Telegraph about grammatical mistakes and stylistic slips have attracted a growing band of ardent fans over recent years. Now, in his new book Strictly English, he makes an impassioned case for an end to the sloppiness that has become such a hallmark of everyday speech and writing, and shows how accuracy and clarity are within the grasp of anyone who is prepared to take the time to master a few simple rules.If you wince when you see "different than" in print, or are offended by people who think that "infer" and "imply" mean the same thing, then this book will provide reassurance that you are not alone. And if you believe that precise and elegant English really does matter, then it will prove required reading.

  • 'A brilliant and scholarly biography of an extraordinary figure.' Lord Blake, Country Life'A fresh, engaging, conscientious account of one of the great Victorians.' Michael Foot, London Review of Books'A thorough and convincing account of 'the sage'. Peter Ackroyd, Times Thomas Carlyle was the most influential man of letters of his day, and his vivid account of the French Revolution remains one of the classic histories. Even George Eliot, no admirer, wrote: 'It is an idle question to ask whether his books will be read a century hence; if they were all burnt as the grandest of Suttes on his funeral pyre, it would only be like cutting down an oak after its acorns have sown a forest.'Simon Heffer draws upon previously unavailable papers to reassess a magnificent, defiant and often lonely individualist whose idiosyncratic and passionate books brought him universal fame.

  • A tweedy purveyor of folklore; too many larks ascending and too much Linden Lea: no composer's work has ever been more cruelly stereotyped than that of Ralph Vaughan Williams. The truth could hardly have been more different: that folksy feel masked the highest sophistication, that countrified air the most audacious experimentation. If, unlike his Germanizing contemporary Elgar, Vaughan Williams did indeed open the way to a distinctively English Music, his was an Englishness which owed nothing to narrow-mindedness or lack of artistic enterprise.Fifty years after his death in 1958, Vaughan Williams' reputation is greater than ever before and there is a resurgence of interest in his music. Re-issued to coincide with this anniversary, Simon Heffer's perceptive book lends weight to the increasingly compelling case for Vaughan Williams' recognition as the most important English composer of the twentieth century.'A vivid and appealing picture of an irresistibly likeable figure ... I enjoyed this little book enormously.'Spectator'An affectionate, accurate and shrewd account of Vaughan Williams' life ... the author's astute commentary on it betokens close and knowledgeable acquaintance.' Sunday Telegraph

  • Anglais High Minds

    Simon Heffer

    Simon Heffer's new book forms an ambitious exploration of the making of the Victorian age and the Victorian mind.Britain in the 1840s was a country wracked by poverty, unrest and uncertainty, where there were attempts to assassinate the Queen and her prime minister, and the ruling class lived in fear of riot and revolution. By the 1880s it was a confident nation of progress and prosperity, transformed not just by industrialisation but by new attitudes to politics, education, women and the working class. That it should have changed so radically was very largely the work of an astonishingly dynamic and high-minded group of people - politicians and philanthropists, writers and thinkers - who in a matter of decades fundamentally remade the country, its institutions and its mindset, and laid the foundations for modern society. It traces the evolution of British democracy and shows how early laissez-faire attitudes to the lot of the less fortunate turned into campaigns to improve their lives and prospects. It analyses the birth of new attitudes to education, religion and science. And it shows how even such aesthetic issues as taste in architecture were swept in to broader debates about the direction that the country should take. In the process, Simon Heffer looks at the lives and deeds of major politicians, from the devout and principled Gladstone to the unscrupulous Disraeli; at the intellectual arguments that raged among writers and thinkers such as Matthew Arnold, Thomas Carlyle, and Samuel Butler; and at the 'great projects' of the age, from the Great Exhibition to the Albert Memorial. Drawing heavily on previously unpublished documents, he offers a superbly nuanced insight into life in an extraordinary era, populated by extraordinary people - and how our forebears' pursuit of perfection gave birth to modern Britain.

  • In his best-selling Strictly English Simon Heffer explained how to write and speak our language well. In Simply English he offers an entertaining and supremely useful A-Z guide to frequent errors, common misunderstandings and stylistic howlers. What is the difference between amend and emend, between imply and infer, and between uninterested and disinterested? When should one put owing to rather than due to? Why should the temptation to write actually, basically or at this moment in time always be strenuously resisted? How does one use an apostrophe correctly, ensure that one understands what alibi really means, and avoid the perils of the double negative?With articles on everything from punctuation to tabloid English to adverbs and adjectives, Simply English is the essential companion for anyone who cares about the language and wants to use it correctly.

  • There were few more controversial British politicians of the twentieth-century than Enoch Powell. There were few more brilliant, and yet, whilst being an MP for thirty-seven years, his ministerial career lasted a mere fifteen months. His influence however was enormous not least as a harbinger of Thatcherism.There was much more to him though: he was a Professor of Greek at the age of twenty-five: a brigadier at the age of thirty-two: he was also a poet, biblical scholar and devoted family man.The word 'definitive' is hackneyed but in describing this biography it can be used legitimately. Not only was Simon Heffer able to interview Enoch Powell he was also given access to Powell's massive private archive.'In future, anyone who want to study Enoch Powell will start here'. Bruce Anderson, SpectatorFirst published in 1998, this biography has been out of print for a number of years. Demand for it however remains constant and Faber Finds is happy to meet that demand.

  • This volume responds to a growing interest in the language of legal settings by situating the study of language and law within contemporary theoretical debates in discourse studies, linguistic anthropology, and sociolinguistics. The chapters in the collection explore many of the common occasions when those acting on behalf of the legal system, such as the police, lawyers and judges, interact with those coming into contact with the legal system, such as suspects and witnesses. However the chapters do this work through the conceptual lens of 'textual travel', or the way that texts move across space and time and are transformed along the way. Collectively, notions of textual travel shed new light on the ways in which texts can influence, and are influenced by, social and legal life.
    With contributions from leading experts in language and law, Legal-Lay Communication explores such 'textual travel' themes as the mediating role of technologies in the investigatory stages of the legal process, the centrality of intertextuality in the legal construction of cases in court, the transformative effects of recontextualization in processes of judicial decision-making, and the way that processes of textual travel disturb the apparent permanence of legal categorization. The book challenges both the notion of legal text as a static repository of meaning and the very idea of legal-lay or lay-legal communication.

  • 'A riveting account of the pre-First World War years . . . The Age of Decadence is an enormously impressive and enjoyable read.' Dominic Sandbrook, Sunday Times
    'A magnificent account of a less than magnificent epoch.' Jonathan Meades, Literary Review The folk-memory of Britain in the years before the Great War is of a powerful, contented, orderly and thriving country. She commanded a vast empire. She bestrode international commerce. Her citizens were living longer, profiting from civil liberties their grandparents only dreamt of, and enjoying an expanding range of comforts and pastimes. The mood of pride and self-confidence is familiar from Elgar's Pomp and Circumstance marches, newsreels of George V's coronation and the London's great Edwardian palaces.Yet things were very different below the surface. In The Age of Decadence Simon Heffer exposes the contradictions of late-Victorian and Edwardian Britain. He explains how, despite the nation's massive power, a mismanaged war against the Boers in South Africa created profound doubts about her imperial destiny. He shows how attempts to secure vital social reforms prompted the twentieth century's gravest constitutional crisis and coincided with the worst industrial unrest in British history. He describes how politicians who conceded the vote to millions more men disregarded women so utterly that female suffragists' public protest bordered on terrorism. He depicts a ruling class that fell prey to degeneracy and scandal. He analyses a national psyche that embraced the motor-car, the sensationalist press and the science fiction of H. G. Wells, but also the Arts and Crafts of William Morris and the nostalgia of A. E. Housman. And he concludes with the crisis that in the summer of 1914 threatened the existence of the United Kingdom - a looming civil war in Ireland.He lights up the era through vivid pen-portraits of the great men and women of the day - including Gladstone, Parnell, Asquith and Churchill, but also Mrs Pankhurst, Beatrice Webb, Baden-Powell, Wilde and Shaw - creating a richly detailed panorama of a great power that, through both accident and arrogance, was forced to face potentially fatal challenges.
    'A devastating critique of prewar Britain . . . disturbingly relevant to the world in which we live.' Gerard DeGroot, The Times'You won't put it down . . . A really riveting read.' Rana Mitter, BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking

  • Drawing on representative corpora of transcripts from over 100 English criminal jury trials, this stimulating new book explores the nature of 'legal-lay discourse', or the language used by legal professionals before lay juries. Careful analyses of genres such as witness examination and the judge's summing-up reveal a strategic tension between a desire to persuade the jury and the need to conform to legal constraints. The book also suggests ways of managing this tension linguistically to help, not hinder, the jury.

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