• Anglais Mr. Kill

    Martin Limon

    On a crowded train to Seoul from Pusan, a Korean woman is trapped in the bathroom and brutally raped in front of her children. Eyewitness account indicate the culprit was a white man, most likely a US serviceman. By the time Sergeant George Sueño of the US 8th Army is called in to investigate, the rapist has disappeared, and the Korean witnesses have had a chance to get very angry about the situation--and all it represents. Many Koreans are resentful of the continued American presence in Korea, and George has a delicate situation on his hands.
    Of course, the US Army wants to do what they can to ensure they are not connected to the crime. If he wants to see justice done, George is going to have to carry out his investigation against the direct orders of his own office, who have assigned him and his partner, Ernie Bascom, a frivolous job of tagging along with an all-female American country band and investigating their missing supplies. But when a second Korean woman is attacked--and this time ends up dead--8th Army can't ignore the serial rapist anymore. With the help of the legendary Korean investigator known as Mr. Kill, George and Ernie embark on what may just be the most dangerous case of their careers.

  • Almost twenty years after the end of the Korean War, the U.S. Military is still present throughout South Korea, and tensions run high. Koreans look for any opportunity to hate the soldiers who drink at their bars and carouse with their women. When Pak Ok-Suk, a young Korean woman, is found brutally murdered in a torched apartment in the Itaewon red-light district of Seoul, it looks like it might be the work of her American soldier boyfriend. Sergeants George Sueño and Ernie Bascom, Military Police for the U.S. 8th Army, are assigned to the case, but they have nothing to go on other than a tenuous connection to an infamous prostitute. As repressed resentments erupt around them, the pair sets out on an increasingly dangerous quest to find evidence that will absolve their countryman.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Anglais The Joy Brigade

    Martin Limon

    In this pulse-racing ninth adventure, Sergeant George Sueño heads north of Korea's DMZ on a mission to prevent war between the Communist North and the American-allied South.
    Seoul, early 1970s: US Army Sergeant George Sueño is on a mission of extreme importance to the South Korean government, as well as the US Army. Kim Il-Sung has vowed to reunite North and South Korea into one country before he hands control of the government over to his son, which means North Korea is planning to cross the DMZ and overpower the American-allied South Korean government. Sueño's mission is to prevent this by sneaking into North Korea and obtaining an ancient map detailing the network of secret tunnels that run underneath the DMZ. To do so, he will have to go undercover and infiltrate the North Korean Communist inner sanctum.
    Aware of the often dubious nature of the US Military's tactics, Sueño is skeptical about his assignment. But he has other things on his mind. The keeper of the map is Doc Yong, a former lover of Sueño's who was forced to flee South Korea the year before--and she has a son. Before they can be happily reunited, the plan falls to pieces, and Sueño is captured. Can he rely on the enigmatic Hero Kang, his sole contact in the hostile country? Will the lovely Rhee Mi-Sook, the leader of the North Korean secret police, be too much to handle? And who are the mysterious group of women known as the Joy Brigade?

  • Anglais G.I. Bones

    Martin Limon

    Praise for the Sueño and Bascom series:
    Setting the standard for military crime fiction, Limóns compelling stories of murder, greed, and abuse of power are set off by the Korean culture and 1970s atmosphere.--Library Journal, starred review Altogether engaging.--The Washington Post Book World Combining the grim routine of a modern police procedural with the cliff-hanging action of a thriller movie.--The Wall Street Journal Its great to have these two mavericks back.--The New York Times Book Review Easily the best military mysteries in print today.--Lee Child Martin Limón does what the best storytellers do: take you away to a brand new world.--Michael Connelly A Korean fortune-teller is being bothered by a dead American soldier who wants his bones found and buried. An underage officers daughter is missing together with a Latino soldier. Several of the leading Korean gangsters who own the bars in the ville have been killed. Sueño and Bascom of Military Intelligence must go back to the founding of Itaewon, Seouls red-light district, in order to learn who killed the soldier, whos taking revenge on the gang lords, and where to find the missing girl.
    Martin Limón is the author of numerous stories about his army police duo as well as five previous novels, Jade Lady Burning (a New York Times Notable Book of the Year), Slicky Boys, Buddhas Money, The Door to Bitterness, and The Wandering Ghost, all available from Soho Crime. He lives near Seattle.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Praise for Martin Limón:
    Its great to have these two mavericks back. . . . Mr. Limón writes with gruff respect for the culture of Seoul and with wonderful bleak humor, edged in pain, about GI life in that exotic city.--The New York Times Book Review Combining the grim routine of a modern police procedural with the cliff-hanging action of a thrilling movie serial . . . full of sharp observations and unexpected -poignancy.--The Wall Street Journal Sueño and Bascom are two of the most memorable sleuths in the modern mystery canon.--The Plain Dealer The writing is plain and sinewy, the characterizations are quietly brilliant, and the moral vision is as cold as a Seoul bar girls gaze.--The Oregonian The pair of GI cops Martin Limón first introduced in Jade Lady Burning, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, are back with a vengeance in their latest adventures in Seoul and the sin cities surrounding the capital in the 1970s. While North Korea menaces and Vietnam burns, these two weave through back alleys and bordellos, trying to tip the scales of justice back in the right direction.
    This time they are not only pursuing criminals, theyre chasing themselves. Homicidal thieves have gotten hold of Sueños badge and are using it to lull their victims just long enough to strike--with his gun. That they are murderers makes it that much worse for the dynamic duo. The army wants its equipment accounted for and the ID and weapon recovered. George and Ernie want to recover their reputation, such as it is. And stop the killings.
    Martin Limón is the author of numerous short stories starring his army police duo, as well as three novels. The Door to Bitterness is the fourth in the Sueño-Bascom series, after Jade Lady Burning, Slicky Boys, and Buddhas Money.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Praise for Martin Limón:
    Its great to have these two mavericks back. . . . Mr. Limón writes with . . . wonderful, bleak humor, edged in pain, about GI life.--The New York Times Book Review Limóns crisp, clear storytelling opens a door to another world and leaves one hoping the next installment wont be so long in arriving.--The Baltimore Sun Limón has the military lingo and ambience down to a T. Plot, pacing, and plausibility are just about perfect.--The Philadelphia Inquirer (editors choice) As usual, Limón paints a picture of Korea in the mid-1970s that is so detailed and richly atmospheric that the readers senses are flooded with the sounds, smells, and tastes of the place. Fans of the Sueño-Bascom series, who have been waiting eagerly for a new novel, can relax. It was well worth the wait.--Booklist (starred review) The only female MP assigned to a base in the DMZ is missing. Has she been abducted, killed, or, possibly, gone AWOL? Eighth Army cops George Sueño and Ernie Bascom, sent to find her, discover a murder that has been concealed, rampant black marketeering and corruption, crooked officers, rioting Korean civilians, and the wandering ghost of a schoolgirl run down by a speeding army truck. It is up to them to right egregious wrongs while being pursued by criminals who want to kill them.
    Martin Limón is the author of four earlier books in the Sueño-Bascom series. His debut, Jade Lady Burning, was a New York Times Notable Book.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Fast and confident . . . well-drawn and vivid.--The Seattle Times A slam-bang thriller. . . . Limón keeps the action coming at a furious pace.--Albuquerque Journal The locations . . . are as amazingly vivid as ever, and his wild men heroes are just as good company.--Los Angeles Times George and Ernie are American military cops in Korea. They work the neon alleys of sin districts, chasing felons and black marketeers. Its not glamorous, but somebodys got to do it. The kidnapping of a child, held ransom for a priceless jade artifact, is more than these seedy cops can handle. They urge the father to pay it. The only problem is, dad hasnt got it. From that point on, officers Sueño and Bascom are pushed into intrigues way over their heads and expected to unravel conspiracies that are beyond them. Can two disheveled, disrespectful army foul-ups cope with all this? Then again, its not like they have a choice.
    Martin Limón retired from US military service after 20 years in the US Army, including a total of 10 years in Korea. He and his wife live in Seattle. He is the author of Jade Lady Burning, which was a New York Times Notable Book, and Slicky Boys.
    Page 278 of Buddha's Money:
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Anglais Slicky Boys

    Martin Limon

    Its great to have these two mavericks back. . . . Mr. Limón writes with gruff respect for the culture of Seoul and with wonderful bleak humor, edged in pain, about G.I. life in that exotic city.--The New York Times Book Review Combining the grim routine of a modern police procedural with the cliffhanging action of a thrilling movie serial, Slicky Boys is full of sharp observations and unexpected poignancy.--The Wall Street Journal Theres atmosphere to spare here and enough suspense to please. A colorful thriller.--Publishers Weekly An irresistible tale!--Seattle Post-Intelligencer Two of the more memorable sleuths in the modern mystery canon.--The Cleveland Plain Dealer The writing is plain and sinewy, the characterizations are quietly brilliant and the moral vision is as cold as a Seoul bar girls gaze.--The Oregonian In this sequel to New York Times Notable Book Jade Lady Burning, a pair of American military cops come up against major gang culture in South Koreas back alleys.
    George Sueño and his partner Ernie Bascom thought theyd seen it all, but nothing could prepare them for the Slicky Boys. Theyre everywhere. They can kill a man in a thousand ways you dont even want to know about. And youll never even see them coming. They steal, they kill, they slip away. George and Ernie are about to discover that even the U.S. Military is no match for evil and that human sympathy can sometimes lead to a lonely grave.
    Martin Limón retired from U.S. military service after 20 years in the U.S. Army, including ten years in Korea. He and his wife live in Seattle. He is the author of Jade Lady Burning and Buddhas Money, which will be published in the Soho Crime series next year.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • When a U.S. Army Claims officer is murdered in grizzly fashion the roustabout duo of George Sueño and Ernie Bascom have to go against orders to track a calculating killer and author Martin Limón proves once again why he is hailed by his peers as one of the greatest military writers of all time.
    Early one rainy morning, the head of the 8th United States Army Claims Office in Seoul, South Korea, is brutally murdered by a Korean man in a trench coat with a small iron sickle hidden in his sleeve. The attack is a complete surprise, carefully planned and clinically executed. How did this unidentified Korean civilian get onto the tightly controlled US Army base? And why attack the claims officer--is there an unsettled grudge, a claim of damages that was rejected by the US Army?
    Against orders, CID agents George Sueño and Ernie Bascom start to investigate. Somehow, no one they speak to has been interviewed yet. The 8th Army isn't great at solving cases, but they aren't usually this bad, either. George and Ernie begin to suspect that someone doesnt want the case solved.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Anglais The Ville Rat

    Martin Limon

    How much can murder, and silence, buy on the black market of 1974 South Korea? South Korea, 1970s: A young Korean woman dressed in a traditional chima-jeogori is found strangled to death on the frozen banks of the Sonyu River with only a carefully calligraphed poem in her sleeve. George Sueño and Ernie Bascom, sergeants in the US 8th Army CID, are called in by the formidable KNP detective Gil Kwon-up to investigate. George and Ernie's job is to liaise with Korean law enforcement on matters that may involve or implicate 8th Army American servicemen. But as they learn about the case, George and Ernie realize this isn't their jurisdiction--the nearby village of Sonyu-ri is occupied by the US Army's 2nd Infantry Division, a disciplined and often brutal force that won't stand for outside officers questioning its men. All that George and Ernie are able to glean before being kicked out of town is that they are close to the truth--and that a mysterious smuggler, known locally as "the Ville Rat," holds the key to the woman's murder. Luckily, the pair is officially assigned another investigation in the area, which allows them to continue nosing around for answers. They are to elucidate the circumstances of a shooting incident between a young African American private and his white supervising chief. Racial tensions run high, and George and Ernie must tread carefully to solve both cases. But they aren't exactly known for going out of their way to avoid stepping on US Army toes, and this is no exception.

  • South Korea, 1974. US Army CID Sergeants George Sueño and Ernie Bascom are assigned an underwhelming case of petty theft: Major Frederick M. Schulz has accused Miss Jo Kyong-ja, an Itaewon bar girl, of stealing twenty-five thousand won from him--a sum equaling less than fifty US dollars. After two very divergent accounts of what happened, Miss Jo is attacked, and Schulz is found hacked to death only days later. Did tensions simply escalate to the point of murder? Looking into other motives for Schulz’s death, George and Ernie discover that the major was investigating the 501st Military Intelligence Battalion: the Army’s counterintelligence arm, solely dedicated to tracking North Korean spies. The division is rife with suspects, but it’s dangerous to speak out against them in a period of Cold War finger-pointing. As George and Ernie go head-to-head with the battalion’s powerful, intimidating commander, Lance Blood, they learn that messing with the 501st can have very personal consequences. From the Hardcover edition.

  • @20@@20@Martin Lim@95@oacute;n@12@s series set in 1970s South Korea, an era of heightened Korean sociopolitical tension, pits Army CID agents Sue@95@ntilde;o@21@ and Bascom@20@ @21@against a mysterious woman who may be the leader of a gang@95@mdash;or a thousand-year-old creature.@16@@16@@21@Three American GIs have gone missing in different South Korean cities. Sergeants George Sue@95@ntilde;o and Ernie Bascom, agents for the Army CID, link the disappearances to a woman locally rumored to be a gumiho, a legendary thousand-year-old nine-tailed fox disguised as a woman. George suspects that the woman is no mythical creature, but a criminal who@12@s good at covering her tracks. @16@@16@Meanwhile, George and Ernie are caught in a power struggle between two high-ranking women in the 8th Army. Scrambling to appease his boss and stay one step ahead of a psychotic mastermind, George realizes he will have to risk his life to discover the whereabouts of his fellow countrymen.

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