• Since its publication in 1842, Dead Souls has been celebrated as a supremely realistic portrait of provincial Russian life and as a splendidly exaggerated tale; as a paean to the Russian spirit and as a remorseless satire of imperial Russian venality, vulgarity, and pomp. As Gogol's wily antihero, Chichikov, combs the back country wheeling and dealing for "dead souls"deceased serfs who still represent money to anyone sharp enough to trade in themwe are introduced to a Dickensian cast of peasants, landowners, and conniving petty officials, few of whom can resist the seductive illogic of Chichikov's proposition. This lively, idiomatic English version by the awardwinning translators Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky makes accessible the full extent of the novel's lyricism, sulphurous humor, and delight in human oddity and error.

  • Using, or rather mimicking, traditional forms of storytelling Gogol created stories that are complete within themselves and only tangentially connected to a meaning or moral. His work belongs to the school of invention, where each twist and turn of the narrative is a surprise unfettered by obligation to an overarching theme. Selected from Evenings on a Farm near Dikanka, Mirgorod, and the Petersburg tales and arranged in order of composition, the thirteen stories in The Collected Tales of Nikolai Gogolencompass the breadth of Gogol's literary achievement. From the demon-haunted “St. John's Eve ” to the heartrending humiliations and trials of a titular councilor in “The Overcoat,” Gogol's knack for turning literary conventions on their heads combined with his overt joy in the art of story telling shine through in each of the tales. This translation, by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, is as vigorous and darkly funny as the original Russian. It allows readers to experience anew the unmistakable genius of a writer who paved the way for Dostevsky and Kafka.

  • The First New Translation in Forty Years Set sometime between the mid-sixteenth and early-seventeenth century, Gogol's epic tale recounts both a bloody Cossack revolt against the Poles (led by the bold Taras Bulba of Ukrainian folk mythology) and the trials of Taras Bulba's two sons.
    As Robert Kaplan writes in his Introduction, "[Taras Bulba] has a Kiplingesque gusto . . . that makes it a pleasure to read, but central to its theme is an unredemptive, darkly evil violence that is far beyond anything that Kipling ever touched on. We need more works like Taras Bulba to better understand the emotional wellsprings of the threat we face today in places like the Middle East and Central Asia." And the critic John Cournos has noted, "A clue to all Russian realism may be found in a Russian critic's observation about Gogol: 'Seldom has nature created a man so romantic in bent, yet so masterly in portraying all that is unromantic in life.' But this statement does not cover the whole ground, for it is easy to see in almost all of Gogol's work his 'free Cossack soul' trying to break through the shell of sordid today like some ancient demon, essentially Dionysian. So that his works, true though they are to our life, are at once a reproach, a protest, and a challenge, ever calling for joy, ancient joy, that is no more with us. And they have all the joy and sadness of the Ukrainian songs he loved so much." From the Hardcover edition.

  • Le Manteau - Le Nez

    Nikolai Gogol

    - Et le fugitif était un de vos serfs ? - Un serf ? Le mal serait assurément moins grand ! Le fugitif est...
    Mon nez... - Hum ! Que voilà un étrange nom ! Et ce monsieur Monnez vous a pris une forte somme ? - Mon nez, vous dis-je ! Vous n'y êtes pas du tout. Mon nez, mon propre nez a disparu. Le diable aura voulu me jouer un tour ! - Mais comment aurait-il disparu ? Il y a quelque chose qui m'échappe. - Je ne peux pas vous dire comment ! Le plus grave est qu'il court présentement la ville en se faisant passer pour conseiller d'État.
    C'est pourquoi je veux demander que quiconque l'attrapera me l'amène aussitôt, dans les plus brefs délais. Un matin, alors qu'Ivan lakovlevitch découvre un nez dans son pain, le major Kovaliov, terrifié, s'aperçoit au réveil de la disparition du sien. Ce dernier met alors tout en oeuvre pour le retrouver.

  • Le Nez

    Nikolai Gogol

    Le Nez commence par une mauvaise surprise : dans la miche de pain qu'il s'apprête à avaler, le barbier Ivan Iakovlévitch découvre avec stupeur. un nez. Il s'en débarrasse sur le champ sans savoir que son propriétaire, le major Platon Kovaliov, vient de sauter de son lit en constatant avec effroi que ses narines ont pris la fuite. S'ensuit une course folle dans les rues de Saint Pétersbourg. Elle sera marquée par la rencontre entre Kovaliov et son nez, devenu étrangement autonome et se promenant habillé en conseiller d'État. Une histoire ubuesque, drôle et satirique.

  • Les âmes mortes

    Nikolai Gogol

    « Et que voulez-vous faire de cet état ? » s'enquit alors Manilov.
    Cette question parut embarrasser le visiteur... « Vous désirez savoir ce que j'en veux faire ? Voici : je désire acheter des paysans... prononça enfin Tchitchikov qui s'arrêta net.
    - Permettez-moi de vous demander, dit Manilov, comment vous désirez les acheter : avec ou sans la terre ?
    - Non, il ne s'agit pas précisément de paysans, répondit Tchitchikov : je voudrais avoir des morts...
    - Comment ? Excusez... je suis un peu dur d'oreille, j'ai cru entendre un mot étrange.
    - J'ai l'intention d'acheter des morts... »

  • Dans une ville provinciale de Russie, le mystérieux Tchitchikov offre aux propriétaires terriens de leur racheter leurs « âmes mortes » - leurs serfs décédés depuis le dernier recensement. Galerie de portraits, satire mordante, odyssée burlesque, les Âmes mortes sont le premier grand roman russe.

    Traduction intégrale, avec une introduction et des notes, par Henri Mongault, 1925.

  • Anglais The Nose

    Nikolai Gogol

    A masterpiece of satire and a key work of the Russian "fantastic" movement. One of the most celebrated tales in Russian literature.
    Collegiate Assessor Kovalyov awakens to discover that his nose is missing, leaving a smooth, flat patch of skin in its place. He finds and confronts his nose in the Kazan Cathedral, but from its clothing it is apparent that the nose has acquired a higher rank in the civil service than he and refuses to return to his face.
    THE ART OF THE NOVELLA Too short to be a novel, too long to be a short story, the novella is generally unrecognized by academics and publishers but beloved and practiced by literature's greatest writers. The Art of the Novella Series celebrates this renegade art form and its practitioners. The series has been recognized for its "excellence in design" by AIGA.

  • Sous le nom de l'apiculteur Panko le Rouge, Gogol signe avec ces veillées ses débuts littéraires. Il y mêle, dans une veine où le comique côtoie le fantastique, les souvenirs de son enfance, de ces récits racontés le soir au coin du feu où l'on retrouve toutes les figures du folklore ukrainien : belles jeunes filles et hardis garçons, paysans et commères, sorcières et diables, revenants et roussalkas.

    Traduction intégrale des huit récits en deux parties par Eugénie Tchernosvitow, 1944.

  • Traduction de Marc Semenoff, 1922.

    Créée à Saint-Pétersbourg en 1836, d'après une histoire racontée à Gogol par Pouchkine, le Révizor est la plus célèbre comédie du théâtre russe : Khlestakof, un jeune voyageur, tout juste arrivé dans une petite ville province, est pris par les notables pour l'envoyé secret du tsar chargé d'enquêter sur eux. Auprès du rusé Khlestakof, qui n'en demandait pas tant, les notables vont rivaliser d'amabilités et de largesses.
    Le Mariage, créé en 1842 mais écrit au même moment que le Révizor, raconte les atermoiements d'un fonctionnaire, Podkoliossine, célibataire endurci décidé, peut-être, à ne plus le rester.

  • Since its publication in 1842, Dead Souls has been celebrated as a supremely realistic portrait of provincial Russian life and as a splendidly exaggerated tale; as a paean to the Russian spirit and as a remorseless satire of imperial Russian venality, vulgarity, and pomp. As Gogol's wily antihero, Chichikov, combs the back country wheeling and dealing for "dead souls"--deceased serfs who still represent money to anyone sharp enough to trade in them--we are introduced to a Dickensian cast of peasants, landowners, and conniving petty officials, few of whom can resist the seductive illogic of Chichikov's proposition. This lively, idiomatic English version by the award-winning translators Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky makes accessible the full extent of the novel's lyricism, sulphurous humor, and delight in human oddity and error.

  • En douze chants, Gogol conte l'épopée du vieux Tarass Boulba et de ses deux fils, Ostap et André, partis de l'Ukraine avec tous les Cosaques zaporogues dans une guerre sans merci contre les Polonais. Mais André rêve secrètement de la belle Polonaise qu'il a jadis entrevue...

    « Tarass Boulba est un fragment, un épisode de la grande épopée de tout un peuple. » (V. Biélinski) Traduction intégrale de Marc Semenoff (1949), accompagnée d'illustrations de Viktor Vasnetsov.

  • La collection « Fichebook » vous offre la possibilité de tout savoir du Révizor de Nikolai Gogol grâce à une fiche de lecture aussi complète que détaillée.

    La rédaction, claire et accessible, a été confiée à un spécialiste universitaire.

    Notre travail éditorial vous offre un grand confort de lecture, spécialement développé pour la lecture numérique. Cette fiche de lecture répond à une charte qualité mise en place par une équipe d´enseignants.

    Ce livre numérique contient :

    - Un sommaire dynamique - La biographie de Nikolai Gogol - La présentation de l´oeuvre - Le résumé détaillé (scène par scène) - Les raisons du succès - Les thèmes principaux - L'étude du mouvement littéraire de l´auteur

  • Cet ebook bénéficie d'une mise en page esthétique optimisée pour la lecture numérique.




    Cette nouvelle fut écrite par Nikolaï Gogol, romancier, dramaturge, nouvelliste, poète et critique littéraire d'origine ukrainiene. Il est considéré comme l'un des meilleurs écrivains de la littérature russe. Il nous livre ici le journal intime de
    Poprichtchine, un fonctionnaire qui perd petit à petit tous rapports à la réalité jusqu'à finir par perdre totalement la raison.


    Le texte prend un sens quasi-prémonitoire quand on sait que Gogol a lui aussi été employé dans un ministère et qu'il a fini sa vie fortement déprimé, en proie à des délires paranoïaques.

  • Taras Bulba describes the life of an old Zaporozhian Cossack, Taras Bulba, and his two sons, Andriy and Ostap. The sons study at the Kiev Academy and then return home, whereupon the three men set out on a journey to Zaporizhian Sich located in Southern Ukraine, where they join other Cossacks and go to war against Poland.From its beginnings in 1956 to today, the Joint European Series (JES) of Classics Illustrated has provided youthful minds with beautifully-illustrated comic book adaptations of the world's most beloved stories by the world's greatest authors. These books encourage a love of reading and adventure.A collection of Classics Illustrated books is an inviting start to any young person's library.

  • This gothic horror story evokes folklore and sorcery in 19th Century RussiaFrom its beginnings in 1956 to today, the Joint European Series (JES) of Classics Illustrated has provided youthful minds with beautifully-illustrated comic book adaptations of the world's most beloved stories by the world's greatest authors. These books encourage a love of reading and adventure.A collection of Classics Illustrated books is an inviting start to any young person's library.

empty