• Adulte: un terme qui devrait être synonyme d'épanouissement, de réalisation des rêves, de liberté, de vie sentimentale comblée. Or, parfois (voire souvent), il est plutôt synonyme de déceptions et de frustrations pour celles et ceux qui entrent dans cette fameuse ère de l'indépendance. Ils se demandent alors: « C'est donc ça, la vie? »
    Elle-même dans la crise de la vingtaine, Rachel Jones aborde différents domaines qui sont porteurs d'insatisfactions et de désillusions pour les jeunes adultes, et elle montre en quoi Christ et le message biblique peuvent nous aider réellement à trouver le plein contentement auquel nous aspirons.

  • Remember when flying was glamorous and sexy, even fun? When airline food was gourmet, everyone dressed up for a flight, and stewardesses catered to our every need-at least in our imaginations? This classic memoir by two audaciously outspoken young ladies, who lived and loved the free-spirited stewardess life, jets you back to those golden days of air travel-from the captain who's as subtle as a 747 when he's on the make to the passenger who mistakes the overhead luggage rack for an upper berth; from the names of celebrities who were a pleasure to serve (and some surprising notables on the "bad guy" list) to the origins of some naughty stereotypes-Spaniards are the best lovers, actors the most foul-mouthed. This huge bestseller, a First Class jet-age journal, offers a hilarious gold mine of outrageous anecdotes from the high-flying and amorous lives of those busty, lusty, adventuresome young women of the swinging '60s known as "stews."

  • Don't Change the Light Bulbs offers tips and hints on how to be the best teacher you can be, and is written by some of the most respected leaders in education today. It covers primary, secondary and post 16 phases, in addition to cross curricular sections on leadership, ICT, inclusion, creativity, SEN and tutoring. It also presents the practical advice of those who have been there and done it and who now want to share their collective wisdom with you. The aim of which is to make education better, not just in your classroom but for everyone. A useful and inspirational book, it can be read straight through, or dipped in and out of for subject specific advice. A one-stop shop to inspire, invigorate and re-energise teachers and leaders alike, it's comprehensively written and covers an exceptional subject breadth. There is something for everyone, as it provides hints and ideas from both sides of the knowledge/skills debate, and challenges the perceived divide between primary and secondary pedagogy. Don't Change the Light Bulbs will provoke discussion, not only over its useful ideas, but also because of how it seeks to rethink the way we see imagined dichotomies in education. The wise words found within its pages will inspire your teaching, encouraging and supporting you, whilst you are stimulated to think outside of the classroom walls. For use by, and of interest to, everyone involved in the education sector.

  • Anglais Irigaray

    Rachel Jones

    • Polity
    • 3 Mai 2013

    The work of French Philosopher Luce Irigaray has exerted a profound influence on feminist thinking of recent decades and provides a far-reaching challenge to western philosophy's entrenched patriarchal norms. This book guides the reader through Irigaray's critical and creative transformation of western thought. Through detailed analysis of her most important text, Speculum of the Other Woman, Rachel Jones carefully examines Irigaray's transformative readings of such icons of the western tradition as Plato, Descartes, Kant and Hegel. She shows that these readings underpin Irigaray's claim that western philosophy has been dependent on the forgetting of both sexual difference and of our singular beginnings in birth. In response, Irigaray seeks to recover a positive account of sexual difference which would release woman from her traditional position as the 'other' of the subject and allow her to speak as a subject in her own right. In a sensitive reading of Irigaray's work, Jones shows why this distinctively feminist project necessarily involves the transformation of the fundamental terms of western metaphysics. By foregrounding Irigaray's approach to questions of otherness and alterity, she concludes that, for Irigaray, cultivating an ethics of sexuate difference is the condition of ethical relations in general. Lucidly and persuasively written, this book will be an invaluable resource for students and scholars seeking to understand Irigaray's original contribution to philosophical and feminist thought.

  • What can you do with a pack of marshmallows and some tinfoil? Create innovative, engaging learning opportunities; if you embrace the teacher geek mentality. What was your best lesson like? Rachel Jones thinks that her best lessons have happened when she's been brave enough to wonder, ‘What might happen if …?' and done something a bit different. That is what Teacher Geek is all about: making the most of the resources you have at your disposal, and shaking up your thinking about what will inspire, engage and motivate learners. A teacher geek will look to exploit all potential learning opportunities, and be comfortable with taking risks by working with resources from outside their subject area. You have nothing to lose by trying a few new ideas out in your classroom. What is more, a little teacher geek thinking can make lesson planning a whole lot easier. Here Rachel shows you how to blend edu-geeky analogue and digital teaching techniques, and offers suggestions on how to inspire your students, revitalise your practice, and gain the rapt attention of your class. Teacher Geek shows you how to turn your passion as an educator into real results in your classroom. It is all about celebrating a real love of teaching and learning. It doesn't matter whether you have access to the latest technology, or whatever else you have at your disposal, it is all about creativity, confidence and celebrating achievement. And – let's face it – there is more to life than worksheets. Suitable for all teachers.

  • In this accessible combination of post-colonial theory, feminism and pedagogy, the author advocates using subversive and contemporary artistic representations of women to remodel traditional stereotypes in education. It is in this key sector that values and norms are molded and prejudice kept at bay, yet the legacy of colonialism continues to pervade official education received in classrooms as well as `unofficial' education ingested via popular culture and the media. The result is a variety of distorted images of women and gender in which women appear as two-dimensional stereotypes.The text analyzes both current and historical colonial representations of women in a pedagogical context. In doing so, it seeks to recast our conception of what `difference' is, challenging historical, patriarchal gender relations with their stereotypical representations that continue to marginalize minority populations in the first world and billions of women elsewhere. These distorted images, the book argues, can be subverted using the semiology provided by postcolonialism and transnational feminism and the work of contemporary artists who rethink and recontextualize the visual codes of colonialism. These resistive images, created by women who challenge and subvert patriarchal modes of representation, can be used to create educational environments that provide an alternative view of women of non-western origin.

  • (Re)thinking Orientalism is a text that examines the visual discourse of Orientalism through the pedagogy of contemporary graphic narratives. Using feminist, critical race, and postcolonial theoretical and pedagogical lenses, the book uses visual discourse analysis and visual semiology to situate the narratives within Islamophobia and neo-Orientalism in the post-9/11 media context. In the absence of mainstream media that tells the complex stories of Muslim Americans and Muslims around the world, there has been a wave of publications of graphic narratives written and drawn from various perspectives that can be used to create curriculum that presents culture, religion, and experience from a multitude of perspectives. The book is an accessible, upper level undergraduate/graduate level text written to give readers insights into toxic xenophobia created through media representation. It provides a theoretical foundation for students to engage in critical analysis and production of visual media.

  • "With clarity and confidence, this vibrant volume summons up 'the social' in geography in ways that will excite students and scholars alike. Here the social is populated not only by society, but by culture, nature, economy and politics."
    - Kay Anderson, University of Western Sydney
    "This is a remarkable collection, full of intellectual gems. It not only summarises the field of social geography, and restates its importance, but also produces a manifesto for how the field should look in the future."
    - Nigel Thrift, Vice-Chancellor, University of Warwick
    "The book aims to be accessible to students and specialists alike. Its success lies in emphasizing the crossovers between geography and social studies. The good editorial work is evident and the participating contributors are well-established scholars in their respective fields."
    - Miron M. Denan, Geography Research Forum
    "An excellent handbook that will attract a diversity of readers. It will inspire undergraduate/postgraduate students and stimulate lecturers/researchers interested in the complexity and diversity of the social realm.... As the first of its kind in the sub-discipline, it is a book that is enjoyable to read and will definitely add value to a personal or library collection."
    - Michele Lobo, New Zealand Geographer
    The social relations of difference - from race and class to gender and inequality - are at the heart of the concept of social geography. This handbook reconsiders and redirects research in the discipline while examining the changing ideas of individuals and their relationship with structures of power.
    Organised into five sections, the SAGE Handbook of Social Geographies maps out the 'connections' anchored in social geography.

    Difference and Diversity builds on enduring ideas of the structuring of social relations and examines the ruptures and rifts, and continuities and connections around social divisions.
    Geographies and Social Economies rethinks the sociality, subjectivity and placement of money, markets, price and value.
    Geographies of Wellbeing builds from a foundation of work on the spaces of fear, anxiety and disease towards newer concerns with geographies of health, resilience and contentment.
    Geographies of Social Justice connects ideas through an examination of the possibilities and practicalities of normative theory and frames the central notion of Social geography, that things always could and should be different.
    Doing Social Geography is not exploring the 'how to' of research, but rather the entanglement of it with practicalities, moralities, and politics.


     This will be an essential resource for academics, researchers, practitioners and postgraduates across human geography.

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