• In Ghost Map Steven Johnson tells the story of the terrifying cholera epidemic that engulfed London in 1854, and the two unlikely heroes - anaesthetist Doctor John Snow and affable clergyman Reverend Henry Whitehead - who defeated the disease through a combination of local knowledge, scientific research and map-making. In telling their extraordinary story, Johnson also explores a whole world of ideas and connections, from urban terror to microbes, ecosystems to the Great Stink, cultural phenomena to street life. Re-creating a London full of dirt, dust heaps, slaughterhouses and scavengers, Ghost Map is about how huge populations live together, how cities can kill - and how they can save us.

  • What connects the "miracle on the Hudson" to the planning of the French railway system, or the mysterious outbreak of strange smells in downtown Manhattan to the invention of the Internet? With his characteristic flair for multidisciplinary storytelling, Steven Johnson shows in Future Perfect that what lies behind these and many other fascinating human stories is the concept of networked thinking.Exploring a new vision of progress, Johnson argues that networked thinking holds the key to an incredible range of human achievements, and can transform everything from local government to drug research to arts funding and education. Future Perfect paints a compelling portrait of a new model of political change that is already on the rise, and shows that despite Western political systems hopelessly gridlocked by old ideas, change for the better can happen, and that new solutions are on the horizon.'If you're a pessimist-and chances are you are-you should read Future Perfect. In fact, read it even if you're an optimist, because Mr. Johnson's book will give you lots of material to brighten the outlook of your gloomy friends...it envisions a new political movement' Wall Street Journal
    'An informative, tech-savvy and provocative vision of a new and more democratic public philosophy. A breath of fresh air a breath of fresh air in an age of gridlock, cynicism and disillusionment' San Francisco Chronicle
    'A buoyant and hopeful book ... Future Perfect reminds us we already have the treatment. We just need to use it' Boston Globe
    Steven Johnson is the US bestselling author of Where Good Ideas Come From, The Invention of Air, The Ghost Map, and Everything Bad Is Good for You, and is the editor of the anthology The Innovator's Cookbook. He is the founder of a variety of influential websites - most recently, outside.in - and writes for Time, Wired, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal. He lives in Marin County, California, with his wife and three sons.

  • From Steven Johnson, the bestselling author of Where Good Ideas Come From, comes How We Got to Now, the companion book to his six-part BBC One television series exploring the power and the legacy of great ideas.How did photography bring about social reform? What connects refrigeration to Hollywood? And how did our battle against dirt help create smartphones? In this story of ingenious breakthroughs and unsung heroes, Steven Johnson explores the essential innovations that changed the world and how we live in it.'A new Steven Johnson book is something not to be missed. The author has become the leading writer on how inventions happen' Daniel Finkelstein, The Times, Books of the Year'Graceful and compelling ... you'll find yourself exhilarated' The New York Times Book Review'Readable, entertaining, and a challenge to any jaded sensibility that has become inured to the everyday miracles all around us' Peter Forbes, Guardian'This nimble history of invention . . .is a many-layered delight' NatureSteven Johnson is the US bestselling author of Where Good Ideas Come From, The Invention of Air, The Ghost Map, and Everything Bad Is Good for You, and is the editor of the anthology The Innovator's Cookbook. He is the founder of a variety of influential websites - most recently, outside.in - and writes for Time, Wired, The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal.

  • Essential reading-and progressive thinking-on the subject of innovation, from the national bestselling author. Steven Johnson, an acknowledged bestselling leader on the subject of innovation, gathers-for a foundational text on the subject of innovation-essays, interviews, and cutting-edge insights by such exciting field leaders as Peter Drucker, Richard Florida, Eric Von Hippel, Dean Keith Simonton, Arthur Koestler, John Seely Brown, and Marshall Berman. Johnson also provides new material from Marisa Mayer of Google, Twitter's Biz Stone and Jack Dorsey, and Ray Ozzie, Microsoft's former Chief Software Architect. With additional commentary by Johnson himself, this book reveals the innovation found in a wide range of fields, including science, technology, energy, transportation, education, art, and sociology, making it vital, fresh, and fascinating reading for our time, and for the future.

  • Tune in, turn on and get smarter ... The Simpsons, Desperate Housewives, The Apprentice, The Sopranos, Grand Theft Auto: We're constantly being told that popular culture is just mindless entertainment. But, as Steven Johnson shows, it's actually making us more intelligent.Here he puts forward a radical alternative to the endless complaints about reality TV, throwaway movies and violent video games. He shows that mass culture is actually more sophisticated and challenging than ever before. When we focus on what our minds have to do to process its complex, multilayered messages, it becomes clear that it's not dumbing us down - but smartening us up.

  • From the author of Emergence and The Ghost Map, Steven Johnson's Mind Wide Open: Why You Are What You Think takes us on a journey to the frontiers of brain science and reveals exactly how we're hardwired to think and feel.'You are part reptile, part mammal, part primate. You are a dopamine fiend. You are a walking assembly of patterns and waves, clusters of neurons firing in sync with one another...'Experimenting with the latest technology, Stephen Johnson discovers (among other things) that everything we do - from falling in love to forming a sentence - is caused by neurons firing and chemicals swirling around our heads; that there are gadgets which can enable us to control our own brainwaves; that everyone's mind, like their fingerprint, is unique; and this can help us understand our own mental foibles - and see ourselves in a totally new way.'As Steven Johnson explores his inner world . . . we have a new sense of what it means to be human' The New York Times'Refreshingly personal . . . endlessly fascinating' Guardian
    'Steven Johnson has an eye for the most interesting new ideas in this exploding field, and he explains them with insight and gusto' Stephen Pinker
    Steven Johnson is the author of the acclaimed books Everything Bad is Good for You, The Ghost Map, Where Good Ideas Come From, Emergence and Interface Culture. His writing appeared in the Guardian, the New Yorker, Nation and Harper's, as well as the op-ed pages of The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. He is a Distinguished Writer In Residence at NYU's School Of Journalism, and a Contributing Editor to Wired.

  • Anglais Wonderland

    Steven Johnson

    'The book is a house of wonders' The New York Times
    'Steven Johnson is the Darwin of technology' Walter Issacson, author of Steve JobsWhat connects Paleolithic bone flutes to the invention of computer software? Or the Murex sea snail to the death of the great American city? How does the bag of crisps you hold in your hand help tell the story of humanity itself? In his brilliant new work on the history of innovation, international bestseller Steven Johnson argues that the pursuit of novelty and wonder has always been a powerful driver of world-shaping technological change. He finds that that throughout history, the cutting edge of innovation lies wherever people are working the hardest to keep themselves and others amused. Johnson's storytelling is just as delightful as the inventions he describes, full of surprising stops along the journey from simple concepts to complex modern systems. He introduces us to the colourful innovators of leisure: the explorers, proprietors, showmen, and artists who changed the trajectory of history with their luxurious wares, exotic meals, taverns, gambling tables, and magic shows.Johnson compellingly argues that observers of technological and social trends should be looking for clues in novel amusements. You'll find the future wherever people are having the most fun.

  • Ein neuer Blick auf die Geschichte und Macht großer Ideen In dieser bebilderten Darstellung sechs großer technologischer Neuerungen, die unsere moderne Welt auf vielfältige Weise prägen, zeichnet Steven Johnson die Geschichte der Innovation über die Jahrhunderte nach, indem er bedeutsame Facetten des modernen Alltags (seien es Kühleinrichtungen, Uhren oder Brillengläser) von ihrer Erfindung durch Hobbyforscher, Amateure und Unternehmer bis zu ihren unerwarteten historischen Konsequenzen verfolgt.Das Buch steckt voller überraschender Schilderungen zufälliger genialer Entdeckungen und brillanter Fehlschläge - wie die Geschichte des franzsischen Verlegers, der den Phonographen schon vor Edison erfunden hatte, oder die des Hollywood-Stars, der zur Entwicklung der Technik hinter WLAN und Bluetooth beitrug. Dabei deckt Johnson immer wieder unerwartete Verbindungen zwischen scheinbar unzusammenhängenden Feldern auf: So ermglichte die Erfindung der Klimatisierung gewaltige Wanderungsbewegungen von Menschen, nämlich in Millionenstädte wie Dubai oder Phoenix, die ansonsten praktisch unbewohnbar wären; Pendeluhren trugen dazu bei, die Industrielle Revolution auszulsen; sauberes Wasser erwies sich als Voraussetzung für die Produktion von Computer-Chips.Die Erfindung der Zukunft ist die Geschichte jener kollaborativen Netzwerke, die unsere moderne Welt schufen informativ, oft provokativ und immer unterhaltsam.

  • Get the communication skills you need for career success with this unique book. Preparing you for exams and beyond, the valuable content delves into the issues that you'll face in corporate, retail, and remote support environments. The book offers more than fifty scenarios depicting typical workplace situations, possible responses-and appropriate solutions to guide you. With this approach, you'll gain valuable insight into becoming a team player and learn strategies to communicate more effectively with coworkers and customers.

  • From the bestselling author of Where Good Ideas Come From, The Ghost Map and Everything Bad Is Good for You, a new national bestseller: the 'exhilarating'( Los Angeles Times) story of Joseph Priestley, 'a founding father long forgotten'(Newsweek) and a brilliant man who embodied the relationship between science, religion, and politics for America's Founding Fathers.
    In The Invention of Air, national bestselling author Steven Johnson tells the fascinating story of Joseph Priestley-'scientist and theologian, protégé of Benjamin Franklin, friend of Thomas Jefferson-'an eighteenth-century radical thinker who played pivotal roles in the invention of ecosystem science, the discovery of oxygen, the uses of oxygen, scientific experimentation, the founding of the Unitarian Church, and the intellectual development of the United States. As he did so masterfully in The Ghost Map, Steven Johnson uses a dramatic historical story to explore themes that have long engaged him: innovative strategies, intellectual models, and the way new ideas emerge and spread, and the environments that foster these breakthroughs.

  • Forget everything you've ever read about the age of dumbed-down, instant-gratification culture. In this provocative, unfailingly intelligent, thoroughly researched, and surprisingly convincing big idea book, Steven Johnson draws from fields as diverse as neuroscience, economics, and media theory to argue that the pop culture we soak in every day-'from Lord of the Rings to Grand Theft Auto to The Simpsons-'has been growing more sophisticated with each passing year, and, far from rotting our brains, is actually posing new cognitive challenges that are actually making our minds measurably sharper. After reading Everything Bad is Good for You, you will never regard the glow of the video game or television screen the same way again.
    With a new afterword by the author.
    /> Steven Johnson's newest book, Future Perfect, is now available from Riverhead Books.

  • The printing press, the pencil, the flush toilet, the battery--these are all great ideas. But where do they come from? What kind of environment breeds them? What sparks the flash of brilliance? How do we generate the breakthrough technologies that push forward our lives, our society, our culture? Steven Johnson's answers are revelatory as he identifies the seven key patterns behind genuine innovation, and traces them across time and disciplines. From Darwin and Freud to the halls of Google and Apple, Johnson investigates the innovation hubs throughout modern time and pulls out the approaches and commonalities that seem to appear at moments of originality.

  • Anglais The Ghost Map

    Johnson Steven

    A National Bestseller, a New York Times Notable Book, and an Entertainment Weekly Best Book of the Year
    From Steven Johnson, the dynamic thinker routinely compared to James Gleick, Dava Sobel, and Malcolm Gladwell, The Ghost Map is a riveting page-turner about a real-life historical hero, Dr. John Snow. It's the summer of 1854, and London is just emerging as one of the first modern cities in the world. But lacking the infrastructure -- garbage removal, clean water, sewers -- necessary to support its rapidly expanding population, the city has become the perfect breeding ground for a terrifying disease no one knows how to cure. As the cholera outbreak takes hold, a physician and a local curate are spurred to action-and ultimately solve the most pressing medical riddle of their time.
    In a triumph of multidisciplinary thinking, Johnson illuminates the intertwined histories and interconnectedness of the spread of disease, contagion theory, the rise of cities, and the nature of scientific inquiry, offering both a riveting history and a powerful explanation of how it has shaped the world we live in.

  • Anglais Future Perfect

    Johnson Steven

    Combining the deft social analysis of Where Good Ideas Come From with the optimistic arguments of Everything Bad Is Good for You, New York Times bestselling author and one of the most inspiring visionaries of contemporary culture, Steven Johnson, maps the ways a connected world will be both different and better.
    Steven Johnson proposes that a new model of political change is on the rise transforming everything from local government to classrooms to health care. It's a compelling new political worldview that breaks with traditional categories of liberal or conservative thinking. Johnson explores this innovative vision through a series of fascinating narratives: from the 'Miracle on the Hudson' to the planning of the French railway system; from the battle against malnutrition in Vietnam to a mysterious outbreak of strange smells in downtown Manhattan; from underground music video artists to the invention of the Internet itself. At a time when the conventional wisdom holds that the political system is hopelessly gridlocked with old ideas, Future Perfect makes the timely and uplifting case that progress is still possible.

  • Anglais How We Got to Now

    Johnson Steven

    From the New York Timesbestselling author of Where Good Ideas Come From and Everything Bad Is Good for You, a new look at the power and legacy of great ideas.In this illustrated history, Steven Johnson explores the history of innovation over centuries, tracing facets of modern life (refrigeration, clocks, and eyeglass lenses, to name a few) from their creation by hobbyists, amateurs, and entrepreneurs to their unintended historical consequences. Filled with surprising stories of accidental genius and brilliant mistakesfrom the French publisher who invented the phonograph before Edison but forgot to include playback, to the Hollywood movie star who helped invent the technology behind Wi-Fi and BluetoothHow We Got to Now investigates the secret history behind the everyday objects of contemporary life.In his trademark style, Johnson examines unexpected connections between seemingly unrelated fields: how the invention of air-conditioning enabled the largest migration of human beings in the history of the speciesto cities such as Dubai or Phoenix, which would otherwise be virtually uninhabitable; how pendulum clocks helped trigger the industrial revolution; and how clean water made it possible to manufacture computer chips. Accompanied by a major six-part television series on PBS, How We Got to Now is the story of collaborative networks building the modern world, written in the provocative, informative, and engaging style that has earned Johnson fans around the globe.

  • In the wake of the horrific double-murder suicide, four noted wrestling writers grapple with the life and death of Chris Benoit in this book by Steven Johnson, Heath McCoy, Irvin Muchnick, and Greg Oliver, all respected investigative journalists committed to looking at this terrible event with integrity and passion. All four authors have been interviewed extensively about the Benoit situation, including by CNN and Fox.

    The book will discuss the subject from distinct perspectives:
    - The media's coverage of the story and the role of the media in the story itself will be covered by Steven Johnson.
    - Heath McCoy establishes the facts of the case and examines Benoit's Alberta wrestling roots.
    - Irvin Muchnick gives his opinion on the pop-cultural relevance and the place of this tragedy in wrestling's dark history.
    - Greg Oliver discusses the Benoit story in the context of the pro-wrestling industry and personal correspondence with Benoit.

  • ?The legendary Terry Sawchuk is said to have kept parts of himself in jars: one for teeth, one for bone chips, and another for his appendix. no cage contains a stare that well is jarring in much the same way. Each poem in this collection is a self-contained vessel in which a distinct bit of our national game - a player or a fight, a save or a goal, an injury or a regret - is preserved; mementos cross-cut into countless sheets of ice.

    Often dark and brooding, this book offers a league of gloomy characters: a spiteful Zamboni driver and a nearly blinded beer-leaguer; a maimed minor-hockey coach and that over-bearing hockey dad you've heard in the rink. These are poems about hockey - shifting their way through the game, its characters, images, and passions.

    no cage contains a stare that well is like an impossible glove save in overtime - exulting in the game while examining the darker, musty corners of its locker rooms. But these poems speak to life off-ice as well: to how we know what we know, how we feel what we feel, and how we win or lose.

  • What happens when the mayor of Sault Ste. Marie decides one day to become the city administrator, then breaks the law half a dozen times while getting the job? He keeps it of course, with the full support of the majority of the community, because he is The Best Man for the Job. This compelling book explores the why and the how of civic corruption in a Northern Ontario city. The story begins in the late 1980s, when the official languages policies of Pierre Trudeau, Brian Mulroney, and David Peterson collided with the Sault's deep-rooted resistance to bilingualism. The man at the centre of the uproar over the city's infamous English-only resolution was Mayor Joe Fratesi, whose unwavering support for the resolution made him a wildly popular local hero. Unfortunately for him, it also killed any chance of his being appointed a judge, which sent him looking in other directions for career advancement. In 1995 he spotted another job he wanted, this one under the control of the city council he had dominated for years. He went  for it, breaking the law repeatedly in the process, plunging the Sault into a bitter two-and-a-half year political and legal battle over ethics in public office. Harvey Sims was one of the Sault residents who fought Fratesi's appointment through the court system. In The Best Man for the Job,  he provides a sobering account of his home town's dysfunctional politics, greed, intimidation, lawbreaking, and contempt for basic standards in public office.

  • Neil Peart's travel memoir of thoughts, observations, and experiences as he cycles through West Africa, reveals the subtle, yet powerful writing style that has made him one of rock's greatest lyricists. As he describes his extraordinary journey and his experiences - from the pains of dysentery, to a confrontation with an armed soldier, to navigating dirt roads off the beaten path - he reveals his own emotional landscape, and along the way, the different "masks" that he discovers he wears.

    "Cycling is a good way to travel anywhere, but especially in Africa. You are independent and mobile, and yet travel at people speed - fast enough to travel on to another town in the cooler morning hours, but slow enough to meet people: the old farmer at the roadside who raises his hand and says, 'You are welcome,' the tireless women who offer a smile to a passing cyclist, the children whose laughter transcends the humblest home."

  • From the critically acclaimed authors of The Pro Wrestling Hall of Fame: The Tag Teams comes the most comprehensive look ever at the colourful villains, heels, bad guys and rule breakers who give professional wrestling so much of its character. In The Pro Wrestling Hall of Fame: The Heels, Greg Oliver and Steven Johnson take readers on an informative and entertaining ride through mat mayhem. With their signature mix of original research, interviews, and anecdotes, they describe the rise and development of wrestling's bad guys, from riots in small-town arenas in the 1920s to the mega-event pay-per-views of today. Intended for everyone from casual fans to wrestling historians, the book explains how a barrel-chested Milwaukee brewer became wrestling's first Nazi, then served his country with distinction in World War II. You'll find out how bleached blond bad guys like the legendary Ric Flair trace their lineage to Gorgeous George - and about the little-known Ohioan that George himself emulated. And of course, Oliver and Johnson's list of the most influential heels in history is sure to spark debate.

    Like its predecessors in this series, The Pro Wrestling Hall of Fame: The Heels features more than a hundred rarely or never-before-seen photos of wrestling's most despised characters - it's a must read for anyone interested in the unique world of sports entertainment.

  • Joe Schwarcz tells it like it is. Whether he's plumbing the mysteries of chicken soup or tracing the development of polyethylene, Schwarcz takes a little history, adds a dash of chemistry, and produces a gem of an essay every time. I wish he'd been my chemistry professor when I was in school. - Christine Gorman, senior writer, Time Radar, Hula Hoops, and Playful Pigs really does "tell it like it is" in 67 short, entertaining, and informative pieces about chemistry in everyday life. Find out the latest about homeopathy and alternative medicine. Fill up on facts about soybeans, tomatoes, tea, ginseng, chicken soup, hot dogs, and the benefits of eating chalk. Explore the science behind Alice's strange adventures in Wonderland, Rumpole's deadly cheese soufflé, and Casanova's experiments with "Spanish Fly." Investigate the nefarious chemistry of the KGB, the colors of urine, and the mysteries of baldness. Find out how virgins can reduce anxiety and how Chinese Restaurant Syndrome may increase it. Learn how shampoos really work, and discover which cleaning agents must never be combined. Get rid of that skunk smell in a jiffy, and get a whiff of what's behind the act of passing gas. Take a painless glimpse into the discovery of anesthetics. Read about the ups and downs of underwear, the invention of gunpowder, zombies in Haiti, Van Gogh's brain, John Dillinger's chemical exploits, little Mikey's exploding stomach, and Dinshah Ghadiali's bizarre attempts to cure disease with colored lights. Even Houdini makes a magical appearance. Finally, discover the amazing links between radar, hula hoops, and playful pigs!
    "It is hard to believe that anybody could be drawn to such a 'dull and smelly' subject as chemistry until, that is, one picks up Joe Schwarcz's book and is reminded that with every breath and feeling one is experiencing chemistry. Schwarcz gets his chemistry right, and hooks his readers."
    - John C. Polanyi, Nobel Laureate
    "Dr. Schwarcz has written a book that has done three things which are difficult to do. First, the book is enormously enjoyable-it commands and holds your attention. Second, it explains science and scientific phenomena in a simple and yet accurate way. And third, it stimulates you to think logically and in so doing, it will lead to a scientifically literate reader who will not be so easily misled by those who wish to paint science and technology as being a danger to humankind and the world around us.
    - Michael Smith, Nobel Laureate

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